Jacob & Co. Astronomia Alec Monopoly

Street artist Alec Monopoly has lent his own inimitable style to Jacob & Co.’s flagship timepiece, the Astronomia, for a new limited edition collaboration.

A limited run of nine pieces are being produced featuring the recurring themes and characters seen in Monopoly’s body of work. That means a dial featuring statuettes of Scrooge McDuck, Monopoly Man, Money Wings and the almighty dollar.

The characters are drawn by Monopoly before being rendered in CAD to establish working dimensions, each is then hand sculpted and cast in gold before being hand-finished and finally hand-painted by Monopoly using bright acrylic paints.
“This is by far the smallest scale ‘canvas’ I have ever painted. Every element, brushstroke and color choice needed to be carefully thought out and perfectly executed,” says Monopoly. “My street art murals are often free flowing and wild but given the intricacies and meticulous mechanics within these watches I needed to approach the creative process with much more precision and patience.”

This 18k rose gold Astronomia’s manually wound four-arm movement is fixed at the centre of a black night sky base with each arm supporting a different mechanical feat, including a rotating one-carat spherical Jacob-cut diamond, a rotating hand-lacquered magnesium globe, a double axis tourbillon and a watch dial displaying minutes and hours.

“Alec is a young artist that started his career taking risks and not thinking twice about it,” says founder Jacob Arabo. “He acted as if he had nothing to lose and he continued to persist until he broke through to become world famous for his creativity and unique angle. I started out the same way by doing something different and unique and I persisted until I was able to break through.”
Recently, Jacob & Co. announced a partnership with graffiti artist Alec Monopoly. Monopoly previously had a partnership with TAG Heuer, so he is no stranger to the watch world. This first collaborative effort with Jacob & Co. is the fruit of great co-mingling, with the result being a highly colorful art piece based on Jacob & Co.’s famed Astronomia three-dimensional watches. The Astronomia Alec Monopoly watch, with four-arm vertical movement and complications, features tiny characters found in Monopoly’s work.
Crafted in 18-karat rose gold, the watch boasts a sapphire crystal and fours sapphire case sides for easy viewing of the movement and the animation inside. Against a sleek backdrop base that emulates a black night sky with stars, the signature Jacob & Co. Astronomia revolving double-axis tourbillon — opposite the revolving watch dial placed on a patented differential gear system — is perpendicular to the arm that boasts the three-dimensional hand-lacquered magnesium Earth globe on one side and a Jacob & Co. proprietary faceted Jacob Cut one-carat diamond with 288 facets on the opposite side. The diamond makes one rotation per minute. The highly complex JCAM10 caliber boasts 365 parts and offers 60 hours of power reserve.
These rotating complications, though, take a backseat in this watch to Alec Monopoly’s art, which comes into play in the form of whimsical three-dimensional characters and bold colors. To begin with, the hands on the watch dial are bright lime green, a signature Alex Monopoly color. Other colors range from hot pink to bright red, and more.

The watch boasts four mini sculptures. One is based on “The Monopoly Man” and is a top-hatted figure holding dollar bills out from hand to hand like a Money Wings figurine. Opposite him I another top-hatted man with white mustache holding what appears to be a dollar-sign melting pink ice cream cone in his hand. The other two figures are Monopoly’s interpretation of Scrooge McDuck holding a bright green money bag with gold coins laying at his feet, and a dollar sign with diamonds and dollar bills painted on it, along with the Jacob & Co. logo.
The bright colors make this watch look almost like a toy – a purposeful effect. The characters are hand-sculpted based on drawings by Monopoly that are computer scaled to fit inside the watch without impeding the movement and the rotating complications. The small gold sculptures are then hand painted by Monopoly using the acrylic paint that defines his trademark art. While Monopoly’s street graffiti can span three-story tall buildings, the watch figurines are the smallest canvas he has worked on to date.
“This is by far the smallest scale ‘canvas’ I have ever painted. Every element, brushstroke and color choice needed to be carefully thought out and perfectly executed,” says Monopoly. “My street art murals are often free flowing and wild but given the intricacies and meticulous mechanics within these watches, I needed to approach the creative process with much more precision and patience.”
From every angle, the Astronomia Monopoly is a rare expression of street art, tiny toys, superb mechanics and odd character. Jacob & Co. has a tag line of “Inspired by the Impossible” and the most recent outrageous timepieces unveiled by the brand, including this one, underscores that motto. Just nine pieces will be made of this artistic Astronomia Monopoly watch.

Jacob & Co Twin Turbo Replica Watch

As far as statement timepieces go, few brands do a better job than Jacob & Co., which was founded in 1986 initially as a jewelry outfit and started making watches in 2002. There is nothing conventional about Jacob & Co.’s watches, as evidenced by pieces such as the Astronomia Solar and the Epic SF 24. This year, the brand unveiled what could be one of its most elaborate and outrageous watches yet, the Twin Turbo Furious. The name hints at the velocity at which its twin tourbillons rotate, but what it doesn’t tell you is that the twin tourbillons are actually triple-axis variants, and that it also contains a decimal repeater, monopusher chronograph, and an unusual complication called the reference time differential. Let’s take a closer look at the Twin Turbo Furious.
The Twin Turbo Furious is a follow up to the Twin Turbo Twin Triple Axis Tourbillon Minute Repeater (Yes, that’s the name. It doesn’t roll off the tongue, does it?) watch from 2016. Like the Twin Turbo, the Twin Turbo Furious comes in a modern rectangular case that measures a whopping 57mm wide, 52mm from lug to lug, and 17mm thick. The watch looks even larger than what the specifications suggest because much of it is actually a large, curved sapphire crystal. People will notice the watch, I guarantee it.
The most unusual aspect of the case has got to be the crown and the accompanying crank-handle. The crank handle can be detached from the case and it makes winding the watch easy and fun. On the opposite side of the case is the activator for the decimal minute repeater. The decimal minute repeater is different from traditional minute repeaters because it chimes the tens of minutes rather than the quarter hours. This makes it easier to ‘hear’ the time.
The expansive dial is a cacophony of colors, dials, and hands. The main dial itself is actually a piece of smoked sapphire crystal with the Jacob & Co. logo. Around the periphery is a red neoralithe ring with white Super-LumiNova hour indexes and the seconds. Working our way in, we have the Pit Board, which is part of the reference time differential. This complication is used in conjunction with the chronograph to quickly indicate how many seconds faster or slower the elapsed time was in comparison to the reference time. The reference time is set using the crown and can be set up to 5 minutes and 59 seconds, which is indicated by the aperture at 6 o’clock on the main timekeeping dial. In the image above, the reference time is set to 1 minute and 56 seconds. Once the chronograph is stopped, owners can quickly see how much slower or faster the elapsed time was by reading the chronograph seconds hand off Pit Board wheel.
Moving on to the rest of the dial, we have the usual running seconds sub-dial at 9 o’clock and the chronograph minute counter at 3 o’clock. Below the timekeeping dial are the two triple-axis tourbillons that are connected by a differential, so that the rates of each tourbillon are actually averaged. These tourbillons spin very quickly, hence the name Twin Turbo Furious. The first axis makes a revolution every 24 seconds, while the second axis makes a revolution every 8 seconds, and finally, the third axis makes a revolution in 30 seconds. The end result is quite stunning as the tourbillon is in constant “furious” motion. In between the two tourbillons is a power reserve indicator.
Contrary to what you might think, the dial is actually quite easy to read. Admittedly, it is quite cluttered but the large red hour and minute hands painted with red tips and white Super-LumiNova help greatly with legibility. The bigger issue is trying not to be mesmerized by those two fast-spinning tourbillons.
The movement within is the Jacob & Co. caliber JCFM05 and it is visible through a sapphire display caseback. It is a beast of a movement with a staggering 832 components and an unusual architecture. Up top are the hammers for the decimal minute repeater, and working our way down is the column wheel for the chronograph. Dominating the bottom of the movement are two gold skeletonized wheels for the tourbillons.

The movement is highly decorated too, with hand beveled and polished plates and bridges, black polishing on numerous surfaces, circular graining on wheels, barrels, and plates, and polished jewel countersinks. Speaking of jewels, the movement has 75 jewels in all.
The Jacob & Co. Twin Turbo Furious is one heck of a statement piece. The styling is bold and the technicalities of the watch itself more than match its styling. Despite what you might think about its looks, there is no denying that this is one hell of a complicated watch with some interesting complications. Making a decimal minute repeater is hard enough, but combining it with two triple-axis tourbillons, a chronograph, and a reference time differential is unheard of. Unfortunately, the price for all of this is equally outrageous.

Jacob & Co Astronomia Tourbillon Everest

Always be prepared for the unexpected with Jacob Arabo… The founder of Jacob & Co. is a sworn enemy of convention. Technically complex and artfully crafted, the Astronomia triple-axis tourbillon concept has given birth to surprising watches… to say the least! The Phoenix, the Octopus or the Casino are all eloquent examples of the versatility of the model. Yet, the Astronomia is not what you’d consider as an outdoor, instrument kind of watch. But it didn’t stop Jacob & Co. from creating the Astronomia Everest that was worn by Swedish explorer Johan Ernst Nilson on a recent expedition to the Himalayas.
A Swedish explorer, Johan Ernst Nilson has climbed the Seven Summits, visited 172 countries and some of the most remote places on Earth. He is known as an “environmental explorer” because of his interest in environment and climate-related issues. Announcing a partnership with Nilson, Jacob & Co. found a great occasion to create a new version of the Astronomia, with the idea of highlighting the need to protect our planet.

Based on the Astronomia Sky, the Astronomia Tourbillon Three Poles/Everest movement is customized with a piece of Mount Everest rock on top, while two capsules contain water from the North Pole and the South Pole – these were all collected by Nilson himself. The watch comes in two limited editions and 24 pieces in total to match the 24 time zones of the Earth – 12 pieces come in black gold with a black Celestial Vault and 12 pieces in white gold with a blue Celestial Vault.
From a technical perspective, the impressive three-dimensional movement of the Astronomia relies on the same principles as previous models. Housed under an impressive sapphire dome, this captivating microcosm stages four animated satellite arms in constant motion:

a 1-carat Jacob-cut diamond (or black sapphire, depending on the version) rotating on itself in 60 sec
a magnesium lacquered Earth globe with luminescent oceans, rotating on itself in 60 sec
an openwork dial providing an orbital display of the hours and minutes and featuring the captions Everest, North and South
finally, a tourbillon rotating on two axes in 60 seconds and 5 minutes respectively (plus a third central-axis in 20 minutes), which orchestrates this captivating ballet
“I wore the regular Astronomia Tourbillon on my last climb to the Himalayas, where I went up to 6,200 meters (almost 20,000 feet), in -30 C degree, extreme conditions,” Nilson says. “I used the Astronomia on the climb in order to test it. You would think that such a complicated watch would be delicate and fragile, but it isn’t, and it performed perfectly in all conditions.”
The Jacob & Co. Astronomia Everest is presented either on a glowing or dark rubber strap fitted with a gold buckle matching the material of the case. The watch retails for USD 884,800 (a nod to the altitude of the Everest). Included in the purchase of the watch are two elements. First, 10% of the price will be donated to charity to help make a difference now. Second, each watch includes an expedition with Nilson, by helicopter, to the place on Mount Everest where the rock was found.
Astronomia Everest incorporates rock from Mt. Everest, water from both Poles of the Earth. If you want to wear history on your wrist and don’t mind paying a fortune for it – read on. Based on the Jacob & Co.’s beloved Astronomia Sky Tourbillon, the watchmaker in collaboration with Swedish explorer and environmentalist Johan Ernst Nilson has created the Astronomia Everest Gravitational Double Axis Tourbillon.

Replica Jacob and Co astronomia tourbillon baguette

Last year in 2014, Jacob & Co. debuted a very interesting watch with an extravagant movement they called the Astronomia Tourbillon (debuted here). I didn’t get a chance to personally see the piece when they debuted it, and I am not sure if the original Astronomia Tourbillon case style (check the link above) was even actually delivered, since according to these new 2015 Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon pictures, there is a totally new case design. The sheer complexity of the movement in the watch requires a lot of tweaking to make it work and years of effort. For 2015, however, it looks like the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon is back with a new case design as well as a very much “Jacob & Co.” version called the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon Baguette that comes with a lot of diamonds.

Below, you can see a video from last year of the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon in action. Much of the movement is placed on a series of four arms that rotate around the entire dial each 20 minutes. Those arms also move to create other actions such as keeping the dial to indicate the time in the proper orientation, as well as operating the tourbillon. Taken together, the entire ballet of gear work in the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon is almost hard to believe. More so, as much as you may like or be ambivalent to what Jacob & Co. produces, you have to give it to them that they understand showmanship is an important part of the luxury watch industry.
Compared to the large sapphire crystal bubble dome over the initial Astronomia design, this new 2015 case makes a bit more sense. We are still looking at computer renders, but I am confident that the smaller pieces of sapphire crystal (which are now divided into a series of windows and one large one over the top) with the additional metal makes for a more plausible, wearable design. According to the brand, the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon is 50mm wide and 25mm thick. The case is in 18k rose gold, and there is a version with and without diamonds.

Notice the lack of crowns or pushers on the case? The movement is actually set and would via two “bow-style” fold out crowns on the rear of the case. The movement, which is, of course, the most interesting element of the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon, is the exclusive to Jacob & Co. caliber JCEM01, with 48 hours of power reserve and a tourbillon that operates at 2.5Hz. Surprisingly, the movement is produced from just 235 parts – which seems very efficient given the complexity of the concept.
Technically, because the tourbillon moves around the entire dial each 20 minutes, it is a triple axis tourbillon. The other axis is the normal spinning you see from a tourbillon cage, as well as being spun in its connection arm. It sits opposite the dial for telling the time to help balance out the weight. The other two arms have a small hand-painted titanium representation of earth, and its opposite arm has a rotating disco ball that makes one full rotation each 60 seconds
Really, disco ball? Well, that is what I am calling it. Jacob & Co. claims that the spherically cut diamond uses an exclusive cutting process debuted by Jacob & Co to cut a diamond with 288 facets. This round diamond is supposed to represent the moon – which makes me wonder what “night life” would be like on your planet if our moon was actually a large disco ball too. While the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon movement looks and sort of feels like it offers astronomical complications – it really only does so in concept. This is really a movement made for viewing pleasure, versus strict functionality – and in that, it succeeds.
If the “standard” Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon isn’t enough, you can opt for the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon Baguette, which replaces the watch face’s night/space sky with baguette-cut diamonds. The diamonds are invisibly-set on the dial and lugs, totaling 342 stones weighting 16 carats. While I personally can’t see myself as a buying customer of a Jacob & Co. Astronomia the fact that there might be a few people out there who can enjoy this sort of wrist-worn mechanical entertainment delights me. Once again, Jacob & Co. set out to shock, amuse, and please… which is exactly what I feel that Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon is all about. Price for the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon (without diamonds)

Jacob and Co Astronomia art

Jacob & Co‘s Astronomia Solar Zodiac receives its biggest design overhaul since the audacious horological creation first dropped in 2014.

Under a vast sapphire crystal dome, the Astronomia replica watch Solar Zodiac Black features the design’s telltale rotating three-arm carousel serving as a mount for a 60-second flying tourbillon, 60-second rotating rose gold, and blue lacquered globe, and three other hand-painted planets as well as a self-orientating dial for hours and minutes. The whole assembly completes a single clockwise rotation every 10 minutes.

But unlike previous versions (Conor McGregor recently showed off a new $1m diamond-set Astronomia) the background, here formed from black aventurine glass and set with a semi-precious solar system of planets, also rotates, completing a single, 360-degree rotation in the opposite direction at the same rate.
At the center of the arrangement is a 2k Jacob-cut yellow citrine, with its 288-facets forming an almost perfect sphere representing the sun.

The planets are formed from cabochon-cut semi-precious stone half spheres: white Granite from Mercury, Rhodonite for Venue, Red Jasper for Mars, Pietersite for Jupiter, Tiger Eye for Saturn with 18k rose gold rings, blue Calcite for Uranus, and Lapis Lazuli for Neptune.
In the watch world, the term “Panda” commonly refers to the iconic Rolex Daytona featured in a classic white and black reference. Jacob & Co. recently took Panada very literally with its newest addition to the Astronomia Art Collection. The luxury timepiece is inspired by the protected species of giant pandas, using quality materials to piece together the vision. The 50mm gold case displays a detailed family of 3D designed pandas in a habitat of baguette diamonds and fine one-piece precious stones representing bamboo. The Astronomia Art Panda is powered by a manual-winding JCAM movement, holding a power reserve of 60-hours. A large-scale black alligator strap and matching gold clasp finish the elegant style of the Astronomia Art. The piece unique Jacob & Co Panda Astronomia Art is currently available through the authorized dealer.

Jacob and Co Astronomia Solar Replica

Jacob & Co‘s Astronomia Solar Zodiac receives its biggest design overhaul since the audacious horological creation first dropped in 2014.

Under a vast sapphire crystal dome, the Astronomia Solar Zodiac Black features the design’s telltale rotating three-arm carousel serving as a mount for a 60-second flying tourbillon, 60-second rotating rose gold, and blue lacquered globe, and three other hand-painted planets as well as a self-orientating dial for hours and minutes. The whole assembly completes a single clockwise rotation every 10 minutes.

But unlike previous versions (Conor McGregor recently showed off a new $1m diamond-set Astronomia) the background, here formed from black aventurine glass and set with a semi-precious solar system of planets, also rotates, completing a single, 360-degree rotation in the opposite direction at the same rate. At the center of the arrangement is a 2k Jacob-cut yellow citrine, with its 288-facets forming an almost perfect sphere representing the sun.

The planets are formed from cabochon-cut semi-precious stone half spheres: white Granite from Mercury, Rhodonite for Venue, Red Jasper for Mars, Pietersite for Jupiter, Tiger Eye for Saturn with 18k rose gold rings, blue Calcite for Uranus, and Lapis Lazuli for Neptune.
Some people probably don’t immediately associate Jacob & Co. with haute horology, but that doesn’t change the fact that the brand is responsible for some of the most outrageous, boldest, and indeed priciest, watches that you can buy today. Just take a look at their Grand Complication Masterpieces and you can find out-of-this-world watches like the Twin Turbo Twin Triple Axis Tourbillon Minute Repeater and the Epic SF24 Flying Tourbillon. However, the mainstay of Jacob & Co.’s Grand Complication Masterpieces has got to be the Astronomia, which has since spawned many different versions like the Clarity & Black watches. The latest one is called the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Solar which we’ll look at today. Again, this isn’t the first time we had the chance to handle an Astronomia watch. The last Astronomia watches we had the chance to play around with were the Astronomia Clarity & Black, but the new Astronomia Solar is even more over-the-top. We will get into the differences later, so let’s begin with the case first.
The case design remains largely the same. 18k rose gold is used to form a rough outline and the spaces in between are filled with sapphire to give owners an unobstructed view of the movement within. Case diameter of the Replica Jacob & Co. Astronomia Solar is 44.5mm, which makes it a little smaller than other Astronomia watches. Case thickness is 21mm, yeah, that’s not a typo. That’s because the case itself has to be quite big to accommodate the fantastic three-dimensional movement, plus it has a wildly domed sapphire crystal. So, the Astronomia Solar, like other Astronomia watches, is really thick. Don’t expect it to slip under a shirt sleeve, and rest assured that everyone will notice it on your wrist – but of course, you already knew that. Water resistance is just 30m, which is understandable for a watch of its complexity. Moving on, one thing some might notice is that there is no visible crown. Well, setting the time and winding the movement is actually done using two fold-out 18k rose gold “bows” on the case back. Unfortunately, we didn’t get to take photos of the case back but it is similar to the system you’ll find in some previous Astronomia iterations. Of course, the eye is going to be drawn to the whimsical and elaborate world created within the dial.

Like other Astronomia watches replica, the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Solar’s movement is exposed for all to see on the dial. There is a lot to see, and also a lot that moves. To begin, the movement actually consists of three separate arms; one arm leads to a sub-dial that displays the time; another leads to a flying tourbillon; and finally, the third arm leads to a globe. Though overshadowed, time is quite legible, the blued hour and minute hands are fairly large and contrast brilliantly against the 18k rose gold skeletonized sub-dial. The flying tourbillon features the logo of Jacob & Co. on the tourbillon bridge and it actually rotates on two axes. Yes, this isn’t an ordinary tourbillon, it is a bi-axial tourbillon. Horizontally, it makes a single rotation every 60 seconds. Vertically, it makes a rotation once every 10 minutes. Finally, the globe, which is made out of rose gold and blue lacquer, rotates on its own axis once every 60 seconds. It also makes a rotation around the dial once every 10 minutes because the entire structure or movement itself rotates clockwise and makes a rotation once every 10 minutes. But that’s not all, because the aventurine base, which is decorated to look like the night sky, rotates counter-clockwise and makes a rotation every 10 minutes. With the Astronomia Solar, Jacob & Co. wanted to create a model of our solar system in a watch. So in the middle of the dial is a large 1.5 carat Citrine crystal in a Jacob Cut that represents the sun. Jacob & Co. also uses three other stones in amethyst, garnet, and smoked quartz to represent other planets. These planets all rotate along with the movement, making a single rotation of the dial once every 10 minutes. The end result of all these rotating elements is stunning to behold and it does look as if you have a mini solar system spinning on your wrist. The movement that enables all this is in-house caliber JCAM19. Comprising of 444 components, the movement is unique because it is mostly constructed out of titanium. Since the mainspring has to drive so many rotating components, titanium is used to reduce the load on the mainspring. The tourbillon beats at 4Hz, and the JCAM19 has a power reserve of 48 hours. It is immaculately finished too, with sand-blasted and beveled bridges, circular graining on the gear train components, and polished countersinks and screws.

Jacob and Co Astronomia Sky Sapphire Mars Satellite Tourbillon

A t Baselworld 2016, Jacob & Co. introduced a brand-new version of the crowd-pleasing Astronomia mega-watch called the Replica Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky Celestial Panorama Gravitational Triple Axis Tourbillon.
The Astronomia Sky Sapphire Mars replaces the magnesium globe with the fiery red planet of Mars, complete with a satellite orbiting it as it turns. At the center of the movement, a lacquered hand-engraved titanium globe rotates on itself in 24 hours, inside a tinted half-domed sapphire crystal, showing night and day.
Down from the 50mm-wide size of the standard Astronomia, the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky is “just” 47mm wide and 25mm thick. No one wears a watch like this because it is slim, but Jacob & Co. was called upon to make a more wearable version of its interesting Astronomia.
The Astronomia Tourbillon represents the very essence of Astronomia: it is a cinematic sculpture animated by its four-arm movement construction that rotates and floats through the sapphire-bound space inside its spectacular case.
At Baselworld 2016, Replica Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky . introduced a brand-new version of the crowd-pleasing Astronomia mega-watch called the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky Celestial Panorama Gravitational Triple Axis Tourbillon. Not intended as a replacement, but rather as a supplement to the original Jacob & Co. Astronomia (hands-on here), the “Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky” adds a few complications and actually has a smaller case size.

Down from the 50mm-wide size of the standard Astronomia, the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky is “just” 47mm wide and 25mm thick. No one wears a watch like this because it is slim, but Jacob & Co. was called upon to make a more wearable version of its interesting Astronomia. Also note that our images of the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky Celestial Panorama Gravitational Triple Axis Tourbillon are of a pre-production prototype. One of the crucial missing elements in this prototype watch is a lack of antireflective coating on the sapphire crystals. This makes legibility rather poor and the watch details almost impossible to photograph through the crystal. Just mentioning that since “final” versions of the watch will not have these crystal glare issues as much.
This debut version of the Replica Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky Celestial Panorama Gravitational Triple Axis Tourbillon comes in a 18k rose gold case with a large domed sapphire crystal on top and a middle sapphire crystal ring around the side of the case. It makes viewing the interior of the watch and the movement very simple and attractive. And, yes, there is a pen to go with it. Well, actually these are pens to go with the Astronomia collection watches overall, and they were produced in collaboration with Jacob & Co. by Italian Visconti. These are also pre-production prototypes, and they will come in 18k rose gold and 18 white gold.
The entire point of the Astronomia was to offer a “four armed” movement which had a dial for the time (that spins to remain upright as the entire movement structure rotated on its axis), tourbillon (that technically moves on two axis points), a spinning seconds indicator, and a spinning orb opposite the seconds indicator. The Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky more or less retains this functionality (although the style and execution is different) and adds some astronomical complications.
Look around the periphery of the dial through the side of the case, and you’ll see a month indicator that uses a small hand which follows along the 12-month scale which goes entirely around the face. Now, look at the center of the four-armed movement structure, and on top of it you’ll find a small orb designed to look like the earth. This earth orb has a half-sphere shroud which moves around it in order to act as a day/night indicator. There are two axis points here to note, and they are the 24-hour rotating of the day/night indicator as well as the fact that the earth spins around each 20 minutes, since that is the rotation time of the four-armed movement. The small “globe” itself is produced from titanium and then hand-lacquered and engraved.
On the dial of the watch under the movement is a celestial star map with a series of zodiac indicators. This face is produced from blued titanium (similar to what we’ve loved in De Bethune watches for a long time) and has an oval “sky indicator” hand. The entire watch face actually makes a full rotation once per year, and the oval sky indicator hand makes a full rotation each sidereal day (about a day) in order to show the stars visible from the northern hemisphere.
As you can see, Jacob & Co. wanted to add a healthy amount of astronomical information to its Astronomia watch, and I think they did a nice job in the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky, while actually making the timepiece smaller. Of course, the watch remains a serious “display piece” with most of the value being in the design and showiness of the fancy mechanics.
Compared to the original Astronomia, the movement design is a bit altered in the Replica Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky Celestial Panorama Gravitational Triple Axis Tourbillon. The “Jacob Cut” diamond is here replaced with a Jacob Cut orange-colored sapphire that spins, making a full rotation each minute, and is shaped like an orb with 288 facet cuts. Opposite this Jacob Cut sapphire crystal is the second indicator hand which is meant to go with some wavy structures that together are intended to represent an orbiting satellite.
The movement inside of the watch is the exclusive to Jacob & Co (and again produced by Studio7h38) caliber JCAM11. Manually wound, the movement is made of 395 parts and operates at 3Hz (21,600bph) with a power reserve of 60 hours. The movement is marvelous to look at with its complexity and focus on being visually entertaining to view in operation.
Combining 18k rose gold and blue (with a matching blue alligator strap), the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky has a decidedly regal look to it. This time around, Jacob & Co. did not include any diamonds on it, but if I know Mr. Arabo, then diamonds will be coming on a future version of the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky. Like most of the watches produced by the brand, the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky is part of a limited edition, and this one is just 18 pieces. I can’t wait to see the final version with the appropriate sapphire crystals, as I think this and the entire Astronomia watch collection represent some of the most interesting “out there” watches which are clearly very lavish, but aren’t the types of watches we immediately assume will look best on an oligarch. I can see the Replica Jacob & Co. Astronomia Sky on the wrist of a successful,

Replica Jacob Co Astronomia Tourbillon

Last year in 2014, Jacob & Co. debuted a very interesting watch with an extravagant movement they called the Replica Astronomia Tourbillon (debuted here). I didn’t get a chance to personally see the piece when they debuted it, and I am not sure if the original Astronomia Tourbillon case style (check the link above) was even actually delivered, since according to these new 2015 Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon pictures, there is a totally new case design. The sheer complexity of the movement in the watch requires a lot of tweaking to make it work and years of effort. For 2015, however, it looks like the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon is back with a new case design as well as a very much “Jacob & Co.” version called the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon Baguette that comes with a lot of diamonds.

Below, you can see a video from last year of the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon in action. Much of the movement is placed on a series of four arms that rotate around the entire dial each 20 minutes. Those arms also move to create other actions such as keeping the dial to indicate the time in the proper orientation, as well as operating the tourbillon. Taken together, the entire ballet of gear work in the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon is almost hard to believe. More so, as much as you may like or be ambivalent to what Jacob & Co. produces, you have to give it to them that they understand showmanship is an important part of the luxury watch industry.
Water resistance is merely 30m, that is clear for a watch of its complexity. Moving on, one thing some might notice is that there is no visible crown. Well, setting time and twisting the movement is actually done with two fold-out 18k rose gold “bows” on the situation back. Regrettably, we didn’t get to take photographs of the situation back but it is like the system you’ll find in some previous Astronomia iterations. Needless to say, the eye will be drawn to the whimsical and elaborate world created inside the dial.Like additional Astronomia watches, the Jacob & Co.. Astronomia Solar’s movement is exposed for all to see on the dial. There is a great deal to see, in addition to a whole lot that moves. To start, the movement really is made up of three separate arms; a single arm contributes to a sub-dial that displays the time; another results in a flying tourbillon; and ultimately, the third arm leads to a globe.Though overshadowed, time is rather legible, the blued hour and minute hands are rather big and contrast brilliantly from the 18k rose gold skeletonized sub-dial. The flying tourbillon features the emblem of Jacob & Co. on the tourbillon bridge and it really rotates on two axes. Yes, this isn’t a normal tourbillon, it’s a bi-axial tourbillon. Horizontally, it creates a single rotation every 60 seconds. Vertically, it creates a rotation once every 10 minutes.Finally, the planet, which can be made from rose gold and blue lacquer, rotates on its axis once every 60 minutes. It also makes a spinning around the dial after every 10 minutes because the whole structure or motion itself rotates clockwise and leaves a spinning once every 10 minutes. But that is not all, since the aventurine base, which is decorated to look like the night sky, rotates counter-clockwise and makes a rotation every 10 minutes.
Compared to the large sapphire crystal bubble dome over the initial Astronomia design, this new 2015 case makes a bit more sense. We are still looking at computer renders, but I am confident that the smaller pieces of sapphire crystal (which are now divided into a series of windows and one large one over the top) with the additional metal makes for a more plausible, wearable design. According to the brand, the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon is 50mm wide and 25mm thick. The case is in 18k rose gold, and there is a version with and without diamonds.

Notice the lack of crowns or pushers on the case? The movement is actually set and would via two “bow-style” fold out crowns on the rear of the case. The movement, which is, of course, the most interesting element of the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon, is the exclusive to Jacob & Co. caliber JCEM01, with 48 hours of power reserve and a tourbillon that operates at 2.5Hz. Surprisingly, the movement is produced from just 235 parts – which seems very efficient given the complexity of the concept.
Technically, because the tourbillon moves around the entire dial each 20 minutes, it is a triple axis tourbillon. The other axis is the normal spinning you see from a tourbillon cage, as well as being spun in its connection arm. It sits opposite the dial for telling the time to help balance out the weight. The other two arms have a small hand-painted titanium representation of earth, and its opposite arm has a rotating disco ball that makes one full rotation each 60 seconds.

Really, disco ball? Well, that is what I am calling it. Jacob & Co. claims that the spherically cut diamond uses an exclusive cutting process debuted by Jacob & Co to cut a diamond with 288 facets. This round diamond is supposed to represent the moon – which makes me wonder what “night life” would be like on your planet if our moon was actually a large disco ball too. While the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon movement looks and sort of feels like it offers astronomical complications – it really only does so in concept. This is really a movement made for viewing pleasure, versus strict functionality – and in that, it succeeds.
If the “standard” Replica Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon isn’t enough, you can opt for the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon Baguette, which replaces the watch face’s night/space sky with baguette-cut diamonds. The diamonds are invisibly-set on the dial and lugs, totaling 342 stones weighting 16 carats. While I personally can’t see myself as a buying customer of a Jacob & Co. Astronomia the fact that there might be a few people out there who can enjoy this sort of wrist-worn mechanical entertainment delights me. Once again, Jacob & Co. set out to shock, amuse, and please… which is exactly what I feel that Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon replica is all about.

Jacob & Co. Oil Pump Tourbillon Automaton

Trust Jacob & Co. to produce a six-figure gold watch depicting an oil pump. Fitted with two derricks, a system of pipes, an oil gauge and reservoir tank, this miniature recreation of an oil rig is so detailed that it is bound to win over the hearts of die-hard oil tycoons. Moreover, being a Jacob & Co. creation the showmanship is guaranteed with two derricks that can perform their pumping motions on demand. Even when the derricks are not activated, the animation on the dial continues thanks to the spectacle of the brand’s hallmark double-axis tourbillon. Let’s have a closer look at this Jacob & Co. Oil Pump Tourbillon Automaton.

Anyone familiar with the brand knows that Jacob Arabo, the maverick founder of Jacob and Co. Oil Pump Tourbillon Automaton , is not an advocate of low-key, conservative luxury. Used to dealing with ultra-wealthy clients (oil barons included), his jewellery and watches pack an inimitable “wow factor”. Over the top for some, downright delightful for others, Jacob & Co’s creations never fail to impress. Let’s take a closer look at one of the most unusual watches in the brand’s repertoire that has the added bonus of pumping oil with a 100% environmentally friendly mechanical power source.
Derrick pumps, also known as pumpjacks, horseheads and rocking horses in oil language jargon, are used to extract oil mechanically from an underground well. Once a prevalent sight across Western Texas, the distinctive feature of a derrick pump is its large anvil-shaped head. Powered by a motor (running on oil, diesel or electricity), the head of the pump is attached to a polished rod that moves up and down inside the well to force the liquid to the surface.
This watch might replicate the rigging and action of an oil pump, but its power source is as green as they come. Just like Pierre Jaquet Droz’s revolutionary 18th-century automata that left kings and queens awestruck by their inexplicable magical movements, the derricks on the Oil Pump are powered by the traditional mechanical technology of an automaton – a self-operating machine that performs a predetermined sequence of motions. The pusher on the caseband at 2 o’clock not only activates the derricks on the dial, but it also charges the dedicated power reserve that sets them in motion – you can see it in the video above.
The largest of the two derricks in the foreground of the Oil Pump has a long rod attached to its head that pumps up and down inside the gold reservoir tank below, while a counterweight at the opposite end of the beam performs an anti-clockwise spin around the hours and minutes dial at 9 o’clock. The smaller derrick in the background performs a similar motion, although its counterweight moves in a clockwise motion.
This realistic miniature recreation of an oil rig is encapsulated in a 49.5mm rose gold and sapphire crystal case with a height of 20mm. To ensure none of the action is hidden, there are additional sapphire glass windows on the sides of the case and a small aperture on the caseback to admire the tourbillon. The rose gold caseback features two extractable bows to wind the watch and set the time, and there is a pusher on the side of the case to activate the automata and charge the power reserve.
Every element in this microcosmic rendition of an oil rig is connected, be it with miniature oil pipes, rods and even cogs. The background of the dial is a grey mesh grille with an aerated honeycomb pattern offering a glimpse of the mechanics. The hours and minutes are featured on an anthracite ring at 9 o’clock with gold Arabic numerals. If you look closely, you’ll see how two gold pipes, complete with silver joints and a red wheel to control the flow, meander behind the hours and minutes disc before disappearing into the movement. Representing the division between the structures on land and those located underground, the central platform on the dial sustains the derricks and an oil pressure gauge that doubles up as a power reserve indicator. The polished rod attached to the head of the derrick traverses the platform to penetrate a rose gold reservoir shaped like a barrel with the brand name and a red warning sign alerting to the presence of flammable material. The large aperture at 6 o’clock, that extends all the way to the caseback, is the stage for Jacob & Co’s. iconic double-axis tourbillon. Increasing the viewing pleasure twofold, the first tourbillon makes a full revolution in 60 seconds and the second in 2.5 minutes.
All the details, like the brightly polished rose gold pipes and the reservoir barrel or the brushed gold and bevelled edges of the derricks attest to the impressive level of craftsmanship of Jacob & Co.’s artisans.
Powering the action on the dial is the manual-winding calibre JCAM33. With 510 components, the movement beats at a frequency of 21,600vph and can store up to 60 hours of power reserve. Although parts of it can be glimpsed through the grille on the dial, most of the movement is hidden behind the rose gold caseback with its two extractable bows to wind and set the time. Naturally, the finishings are superlative with shot-blasted and black PVD-coated bridges and plates, circular graining on the barrels and hand-bevelled mirror-polished edges.
Like other Jacob & Co. watches, reactions are always extreme and not everybody will warm to the extravagance or horological fireworks on board. But that is precisely the point: these watches are not for everybody. They are expensive, extravagant, playful marvels designed to impress. And I am certainly impressed by how Jacob & Co. has injected life into a potentially unexciting theme like an oil rig. The remarkable details, the miniaturisation and above all the animation cannot fail to leave an impression. Although this is not the model I would choose for myself – the Astronomia Tourbillon Typhoon has my name on it – I know that many will succumb to the sheer spectacle and exquisitely rendered scenery of the Jacob Co. Oil Pump Tourbillon Automaton .

Jacob & Co. Unveils Limited-Edition Opera Scarface

When it comes to sheer pageantry, Jacob & Co. Replica Watch has to be placed near the top of the current list of haute horlogerie brands. This is most vibrantly shown in the marque’s more extravagant show pieces, featuring everything from a working model of the solar system to an ornately sculpted golden dragon. One of the most memorable of these in recent years has been 2018’s Opera Godfather, combining a triple-axis tourbillon with visual cues from the classic 1972 film “The Godfather” along with a twin-barrel music box complication that plays the film’s main theme on a miniature lacquered gold grand piano. For 2020, Jacob & Co. says hello to the Godfather’s “little friend” — the limited-edition Jacob & Co. Opera Scarface. Inspired by the 1983 cult classic gangster film of the same name, the Opera Scarface revives the Opera series with a distinctly Miami flair.
The 49mm case of the Jacob & Co. Opera Scarface is available in both 18k rose gold and black DLC-coated titanium variants, both following the same form as the Opera Godfather. This is far from subtle design, with the 23mm-thick main case taking a skeletonized approach to allow a view of the dial and movement from nearly any angle through a multi-part sapphire crystal. The main focal point of the case itself is undoubtedly the oversized rose gold violin-shaped crown at 3 o’clock. In addition to handling winding functions, the neck of this violin becomes a guard for the 2 o’clock pusher used to activate the Opera Scarface’s music box complication. Time setting is moved to a separate lift-out crown on the caseback.
For the Jacob & Co. Opera Scarface, dial and movement more or less become one as the different complications dominate the space inside the case, while timekeeping is relegated to a small subdial at 12 o’clock. This subdial itself is attractive enough, with blued alpha hands above distinctive gold minute indices stretching all the way to the center of the subdial, but the real visual focus of the watch is in the other complications. From a horological standpoint, it’s difficult to top the mechanical spectacle of the 6 o’clock triple-axis tourbillon, with each cage counter-rotating at increasing speed. For sheer novelty value, however, the twin-barrel music box complication taking up half the total real estate of the dial is a definite conversation starter. At 10 o’clock, the playing tines of the music box are mounted under a black lacquered rose gold grand piano whose “keys” move in time with the “Bolivia Theme” from the 1983 film. At 4 o’clock, the second set of tines is covered with a rose gold and red lacquer recreation of the iconic “Scarface” poster featuring Al Pacino’s character from the film. At the center of it all, the globe from Tony Montana’s estate in the film is recreated in rose gold and red lacquer with its famous inscription: “The World Is Yours.” The overall package runs the risk of sensory overload, but the finishing on each element is undeniably exquisite.

The hand-wound manufacture JCFM04 movement is seriously impressive from a technical standpoint. For starters, there are two separate power reserves, one of the tourbillon, hours and minutes, and a dedicated reserve for the music box complication. While timekeeping sits at 42 hours of reserve, the music box can play the full 30-second, 120-note melody three times before winding is needed. In addition to the two musical barrels, when activated, the music box rotates the entire movement, subdial and all, 120 degrees clockwise around the central axis while the hours and minutes subdial rotates on its own to ensure that 12 o’clock remains properly oriented. Beyond the music box, there’s the triple-axis tourbillon, counter-rotating in three unique directions at three different speeds. The outer cage completes a rotation every 180 seconds, with the middle cage rotating once every 48 seconds, and the inner cage completing its circuit in 24 seconds.
jacob and co replica finishes the Opera Scarface with a classic black alligator leather strap, mounted on a case matching folding deployant clasp.
As a natural follow up to the Opera Godfather, the limited-edition Jacob & Co. Opera Scarface may not be to everyone’s taste, but the finishing and presentation is a definite showstopper. Available now through authorized dealers, only 88 examples each of the rose gold and DLC titanium variants will be made. MSRP for the rose gold Jacob & Co. Opera Scarface