Ulysse Nardin Diver Norrøna Arctic Night

Ulysse Nardin and Norwegian outdoor sportswear brand, Norrøna, have collaborated on a sustainable limited edition dive watch.

The all-black 29-piece Ulysse Nardin DIVER NORRØNA Arctic Night is presented with a Norrøna arktis Gore-Tex Pro Jacket Ulysse Nardin Edition and brings together the shared sustainability values of the two brands. The 44mm watch becomes the most sustainable watch in Ulysse Nardin’s collection with caseband and caseback that are 40% Carbonic and 60% recycled fishing net Nylo, case made of 80% recycled automotive industry stainless steel and strap made from 100% recycled fishing nets.

A 4Hz UN-118 automatic movement with Silicium & DiamonSil escapement and 60-hour power reserve keeps time.

It also sees Ulysse Nardin enter into partnership with Norrøna partner and Norwegian polar explorer, Børge Ousland, the first person to complete solo crossings of both the Arctic and the Antarctic.
If anybody outside the watch world were to ask what some of the biggest trends in watchmaking are today, the answer would undoubtedly include ‘collaborations’ and ‘sustainability‘. Ulysse Nardin is no stranger to collaborations, and for its latest Diver, it teams up with Norwegian outdoor sportswear brand Norrøna to produce the Ulysse Nardin Diver Norrøna Arctic Night. Sheathed in dark sustainable materials – or at least materials with a lower carbon footprint – the Diver Norrøna Arctic Night is a limited edition of 29 pieces and comes with a GoreTex Pro Norrøna jacket to accompany you on your next Arctic adventure. Many watch brands have jumped on the sustainability sledge these days and want the world to know they are doing their bit to fight global warming. Long associated with marine chronometers, Ulysse Nardin’s portfolio has always steered on a nautical path with classical renditions like the Marine Torpilleur or more contemporary 300m diver watches in the Diver family. The Ocean Race Diver, which provides the base of this watch, was introduced six months ago and made of innovative, recycled materials, representing the brand’s commitment to the preservation of ocean life. With a 60/40% composition of recycled fishing nets and Carbonium for the case and caseback combined with recycled stainless steel for some of the components, the brand claims the watch reduces its environmental impact by 40% compared to traditional cases. Norrøna, founded in 1929 by Jørgen Jørgensen and still a family-run business, specialises in durable outdoor equipment for Norway’s harsh environment (including wetsuits for cold water Arctic surfing!) and has a goal “to be the most responsible outdoor company” by 2029. To give a real-life action-worn face to the watch, Ulysse Nardin and Norrøna also count on Børge Ousland, a Norweigan explorer, a former deep-sea diver and Navy Seal, as a partner. You’ll be pleased to know that Ousland also served as a consultant in the development of the arktis Norrøna jacket included with the Ulysse Nardin Diver Norrøna Arctic Night watch. The dark palette of the watch, with its mottled grey and white bezel, is inspired by Norway’s deep fjords and volcanic rocks. The robust 44mm case with a water resistance of 300 metres uses an assortment of Carbonium – the same material used for the fuselage and wings of aircraft, with a 40% lower environmental impact than other carbon composites since it makes use of offcuts (leftovers) – Nylo, recycled fishing nets and recycled stainless steel. The structure of the case is built as follows: the caseband and caseback are made of 40% Carbonium and 60% Nylo; the stainless steel container is made from 80 recycled automotive parts; the mottled decoration on the bezel is made of 100% Carbonium; the strap is made from 100% recycled fishing nets; and the components of the manufacture movement are sourced in Switzerland within a 30km radius (to cut down on carbon emissions). The black sandblasted dial features the classic double X-shape embossed in the centre with a power reserve indicator at noon and a running seconds counter at 6 o’clock with a circular date window and Norrøna’s Viking logo in the centre. The short, thick indices are treated with Super-LumiNova and indicated by lumed hour and minute hands, while the markings on the dial, sub-dials and unidirectional rotating bezel are picked out in a contrasting shade of grey. The smoked sapphire caseback with Norrøna’s Viking logo reveals the UN-118 automatic manufacture movement. The UN-118 was the brand’s first in-house base calibre and made its debut inside the Marine Chronometer Manufacture of 2012 and was fitted with cutting-edge nanotechnology in the form of a DiamonSil escapement (alliance of silicium and artificial diamond) and a silicium hairspring. The movement uses 50 jewels, runs at a rate of 28,800vph and provides 60 hours of power reserve.

Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Tourbillon Grand Feu

Ulysse Nardin turned 175 this year, and I’m not sure whether that fact surprised me or not when I opened a recent press release and read about it. The company is old, no doubt, and I’ve seen a number of their older marine chronometers and mid-century dress watches. But so many of its meaningful advancements are bound up in the mechanical watch renaissance that Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Tourbillon Grand Feu was itself, at least partially spearheaded by the company’s longtime champion, the late Rolf Schnyder. In honor of the anniversary, UN is releasing the new Chronometry collection, which connects the company back to its historically significant role as a maker of marine chronometers. And of these new watches, a beautiful, grand feu enamel dial is the showstopper. The layout of that dial, which comes via UN-owned Donzé Cadrans, is a familiar one to anyone who’s seen the company’s watches. The hours and minutes come from the central axis, and a power reserve indicator occupies a slightly unusual position up at 12. The caliber UN-128 tourbillon is down at 6 for a symmetrical look. And the Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Tourbillon Grand Feu has the Ulysse Nardin Anchor escapement, which uses bucking silicon blades to reduce friction and the need for additional lubricant.
Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Tourbillon Grand Feu has long been at the forefront of using silicon in its watches, and this tourbillon is a part of that legacy. I like the look the of the Torpilleur range and how it’s been executed in this new watch within the Chronometry Collection. The watch combines a vintage-feeling design inspired by Marine Chronometers and a grand feu enamel dial with with one of the more sophisticated escapement technologies we have seen in recent times. That dichotomy feels wonderfully representative of Ulysse Nardin as a watchmaker.

Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronograph “Great White”

Shark week kicks off today, a week devoted to the mighty apex predator of the seas whose very existence is being threatened by overfishing. The often misunderstood and feared Great White, depicted as a ferocious man-eating creature in Steven Spielberg’s film Jaws, is essential to the natural order of marine ecosystems. As a brand closely linked to the sea, Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronograph takes its support of safeguarding sharks to the next level and will donate 1% of all sales of its shark watches to support the non-profit organisation For the Planet. It is also partnering with Sharktrust, a leading European shark conservation charity and has invited a new ambassador who knows about sharks intimately. And, as you have probably already guessed, Ulysse Nardin is releasing a limited edition of its Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronograph .
Sharks and Ulysse Nardin are a natural fit, harking back to the brand’s strong maritime ties in the shape of marine chronometers. Moving forward, the brand has now divided its marine watches into two families: the classical Marine collection with an emphasis on chronometry and the contemporary Dive collection, where the first shark-named watches surfaced with models like the Diver Hammerhead of 2010, followed by the Diver Great White, Diver Blue Shark and the Diver Lemon Shark. Such is Ulysse Nardin’s passion for sharks that the predator has become the brand’s mascot. Featured on advertising campaigns, the shark is even depicted navigating urban environments like Fifth Avenue to promote the Freak Vision.
Since 2020 the brand has become more involved with conservation programmes and launched a shark tagging campaign with non-invasive techniques, and partnered with US-based Ocearch to track the mighty predator. Ulysse Nardin has even adopted two Great Whites (Carcharodon carcharias) as brand ambassadors, Andromache, an adult female and Ulysse, a 12-foot-long Great White, both of whom can be tracked in real-time through Ocearch.

The brand’s latest partnerships are with Sharktrust, a UK-based shark conservation charity addressing unsustainable and unmanaged fisheries and supply chains that encourage the consumption of shark products. Recent reports indicate that oceanic sharks have declined by 71% in the last 50 years, mainly due to overfishing. Ulysse Nardin is also committed to supporting 1% for the Planet, a global organisation that channels support from businesses and individuals to non-profit environmental projects. And last, but by no means least, Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronograph has invited Mike Coutts to become a new friend of the brand. After having his leg torn off by a bull shark while bodyboarding in Hawaii, Mike Coutts turned his tragedy into a career of conservation as a marine photographer.
With all this goodwill and commitment in place, there had to be a watch, and the brand is releasing a grey and white version shark-themed of its 44m Diver Chrono. Playing with the colours of the Great White shark, the grey sandblasted dial evokes the rough skin of a shark and the white rubber details echo the white underside of this species.
Ulysse Nardin’s bold Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronograph underwent a facelift in 2019, gaining a more streamlined profile and a more contemporary face. Equipped with a 12-notched concave dive bezel with raised numerals and Super-LumiNova on the 0, the bezel has a white rubber insert. The 44mm is made of grey titanium with sandblasted and brushed finishings, in line with the instrumental character of this 300m water-resistant diver. Two pushers with white rings flank the screw-down crown.
The three slightly recessed counters – 30-minute at 3, small seconds at 9, and 12-hour and small seconds & date at 6 o’clock – feature crisp white and blue markings. The brand name with the applied anchor appears at noon with the inscription Great White below. As a resilient diver, the wide applied indices for the hours and all the hands are treated with Super-LumiNova that glows blue in the dark. Another fun detail is the shark motif on the white rubber strap that has been cut out to reveal the blue lume below. The rubber strap features the hallmark titanium element at 6 o’clock and can be ordered with a titanium tang buckle or a deploying buckle.
The profile of a Great White shark is stamped on the caseback protecting the brand’s in-house, automatic, integrated, column-wheel chronograph movement with a 48-hour power reserve. As the precursor of the use of silicon (silicium at UN), the escapement is made from silicon and beats at a modern 4Hz frequency.
The Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronograph 44mm Great White is a limited edition of 300 watches and retails for CHF 12,600 with the tang buckle and CHF 12,850 with the deploying buckle. As we mentioned, 1% of the revenues generated from the sale of this watch will be donated to support non-profit organisations committed to the conservation of sharks.

Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronometer Tourbillon

Why do so many watch brands have freedivers as ambassadors? After all, the dive watch came about, and was used for decades, to track elapsed bottom time while the person wearing it breathes compressed air, specifically to avoid overstaying no-decompression limits or to time deco stops. Yet for years we’ve seen many brands tout their relationships with such apnea luminaries as Carlos Coste (Oris), Herbert Nitsch (Breitling), Guillaume Néry (Ball and now Panerai), Tanya Streeter (TAG Heuer), Tudor (Morgan Bourc’his) and of course, Jacques Mayol (Omega). At first blush, it seems illogical. After all, freediving involves going deep on a single breath, in which the risk of decompression illness is negligible and elapsed time is typically less than a couple of minutes. Freedivers are also proud of their sports’ minimalism. Whereas scuba diving is all about the equipment – heavy tanks, buoyancy vests and regulators – freediving requires nothing more than a mask at its most basic, maybe a wetsuit and set of fins if you’re not quite as ascetic. I doubt most freedivers even bother to glance at the time while underwater, much less wear a watch.

The answer to my own question is likely that, since very few really use a watch anymore for scuba diving, watch companies might as well seek their underwater wrist models from the more aesthetically beautiful sport. Scuba diving is complicated, cluttered with unwieldy hoses and straps. Freediving is sleek and athletic, the human form in graceful silhouette against the blue. There is a purity of form that suits a well designed watch and the notion of stripping down to the basics – fins, a mask, a watch – has appeal to everyone from avid watersports enthusiasts to tropical holiday-makers, not to mention the confusing and arcane “rules” and training of scuba.
The latest luxury brand to sign an elite freediver as an ambassador, is Ulysse Nardin, with the Belgian, Fred Buyle, wearing their latest Diver Chronometer on his wrist. I was recently invited to the French Riviera to experience UN’s new trio of dive watches, meet Fred Buyle, and do some freediving in the Mediterranean.
Just last year, in Bermuda, I had a chance to dive with the previous iteration of Ulysse’s dive watch, the Marine Diver (in Artemis Racing Edition livery) and the new Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronometer doesn’t stray too far from its predecessor. Still present is the trademark bezel with oversized bezel rider tabs, the power reserve and small seconds, and the rubber strap with its uniquely integrated metal link. However, it has been streamlined, simplified, and cleaned up. Gone is the wave textured dial and the skeleton hands. The concave bezel hashes are bolder, more sporty, the crystal is domed, and the rubber strap does away with a folding deployant clasp in favor of a simpler and more “dive friendly” pin buckle. It is more evolution than revolution and Ulysse was smart not to reinvent what was an already recognizable design.
There are three versions: a blue or black dial “standard” version, a “Monaco Yacht Show” limited edition (with black surface treatment, and gold bezel and crown), and the all-white “Diver Great White” limited edition. The watches are all housed in 44-millimeter titanium cases and powered by the in-house UN-118 calibre, which is visible through a sapphire caseback on all but the Great White edition, which has a solid back engraved with the watch’s namesake Carcharodon carcharias. The chronometer-certified self-winding movement boasts 60 hours of power reserve and strong anti-magnetic properties, thanks to the silicon balance.
Of the new Ulysse divers, I found the blue and black versions most appealing. Though they all share the same basic form and movement, the simpler ones work best, in my opinion. Titanium is a smart choice for dive watches, especially at 44 millimeters, which pushes the limits of size. The concave bezel and domed crystal are cues seen on vintage divers, though overall this is a refreshingly modern take on the dive watch, in a sea of “heritage,” retro competitors. I used to wonder about the purpose of the integrated metal link on the rubber band, but after wearing it for a while, I realized that it articulates the strap past the bony side of the wrist. Many thick rubber straps on luxury divers can chafe at this spot, but the Ulysse divers are supremely comfortable. That said, I can do without the additional branding engraved on it, and especially the cheesy shark and “Monaco” that are found on the limited editions. Equally off-putting to my eye was the “Great White” on the dial of the white limited edition, and its caseback engraving reminded me of the smiling shark in “Finding Nemo.”
I’ve done a bit of freediving in the past, but I’m more comfortable exploring the subaquatic world with a tank on my back. My past experiences learning the finer points of the sport from those far better than me (Carlos Coste, Morgan Bourc’his) have involved lessons on yogic relaxation, breathing technique, and body position, all with the aim of going deeper down a weighted rope, pushing personal limits. But Fred Buyle, who once was a world record holding competitive diver, takes a more Zen approach. He left the competitive side of the sport behind and focuses more on using freediving as an unintrusive way to explore underwater, interact with marine animals, most notably sharks, and as a means to silently shoot underwater photography, all without the noisy gush of scuba exhalations. It’s refreshing, since that’s the way most of us mortals will freedive as well, dipping 10 or 20 feet down to explore a coral head while snorkeling, for example, not chasing a depth tag for a world record.
In the Mediterranean Sea off of Cap d’Antibes, not far from where Jacques Cousteau first dipped his toes into the “silent world,” I traded duck dives with Buyle, descending to a bed of sea grass 25 feet down to eye schools of tiny fish through the dappled sunlight that filtered down. I wore a wetsuit to ward off the chill of the autumn sea, and to counteract the buoyancy, a weight belt with enough lead to let me sink, but not enough to make floating on the surface difficult. I wore the blue Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronometer , and glanced at it underwater a few times to assess its legibility. But let’s not kid ourselves, the merits of most luxury diving watches these days is as a beautiful companion that survives where you wear it.
During a press conference on the trip, Ulysse Nardin CEO, Patrick Priniaux (a keen diver himself) asked Buyle what purpose a watch has for a freediver. Buyle said that it is the minimalism of a mechanical watch that appeals to him. He doesn’t wear a digital dive computer, and said the sweep of a seconds hand more closely mimics the passage of time while underwater. Practiced sound bite? Perhaps. But I could relate to Buyle’s sentiments, with a slightly less tangible take. We watch enthusiasts wear divers because it lets us take our passion, our hobby, anywhere, even into harsh environments like deep under the salty sea. That little capsule of human ingenuity, dry and safe despite the pressure around it, evokes a sense of calm when the sweep hand is viewed through a dive mask 30 feet underwater when the lungs start to burn from the buildup of carbon dioxide. And then there’s the small thrill of stepping off the inflatable skiff, stripping off the wetsuit, and walking right into the bar afterwards with bragging rights on your wrist.

Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronometer chose to introduce the new dive watches in the Mediterranean to coincide with the Monaco Yacht Show, an annual showcase of mega-yachts in the world’s most famous marina and the day after diving, I was walking the docks ogling multimillion dollar watercraft, whose tenders likely cost more than my house. This was an appropriate place to debut the new watches. Though the Diver Chronometer is a sportier take on UN’s underwater watch, it still feels more like a “dress diver,” better suited on a tanned arm holding a cocktail in a chair on the teak deck of a sleek yacht than strapped over a wetsuit sleeve tagging sharks.
As I strolled the show, passing 300-foot yachts with nine-figure price tags, I came upon a lowly tugboat, its aft deck strewn with rusty oil drums, a derrick and coiled lines. It felt out of place, a working boat among the idle rich, a Seiko dive watch among a marina of Ulysse Nardins. Truth be told, my tastes tend to run towards more “blue collar” divers, the Citizen Aqualands and Doxas of the world, with their no-deco bezels, depth gauges, and rippled rubber straps, but there in Monaco, I could see the appeal of something a little more refined. As the definition of the dive watch changes, there’s room for all kinds, and while the Ulysse Nardin Diver Chronometer likely won’t be strapped over my drysuit sleeve for my next Great Lakes shipwreck dive, I can respect it for expanding the reach of by far my favorite watch genre.

Ulysse Nardin freak x

Over the years Ulysse Nardin freak X continues to prove that it is the true pioneer in watchmaking, breaking down the traditional barriers of construction and design. At the 2022 Watches & Wonders presentation, the Swiss luxury watchmaker, often known for disrupting the timepiece industry with its nautical-inspired pieces, has taken to new heights. It appears that this time around, the newly released watches have taken inspiration from the abysses to the cosmos.

Ulysse Nardin has unveiled the Ulysse Nardin freak X Aventurine is one that comes out of a celestial vault, taking the infinite galaxy as an elegant inspiration for the glittering effect seen on the face of the watch. The brand first introduced the Freak X line in 2019 and has since expanded the lineup to continue its Vertical Odyssey. The Freak X Aventurine is equipped with an extra-large 3 Hz silicium balance wheel. Embracing the sleek design, this 43 mm watch also features a blue PVD titanium and 5N rose gold case. Available on the watch is a blue alligator strap with light grey “points de bride” stitches. This particular wrist piece is limited to only 99 watches for $38,000 USD.

Building on its Ulysse Nardin freak X collection, the Swiss watchmaker has released the Freak S, the very first automatic double oscillator with a differential. As an obvious technical extension of the Freak Vision, the new mechanical marvel features noteworthy innovation that includes an inclined double oscillator that uses DiamonSIL technology, a vertical differential and a grinder automatic winding system. Thanks to the mechanism, the two oscillators of the Freak S never oscillate at the same speed. The new case is inspired by the first Freak from 2001 and includes a combination of ceramic, titanium and gold. The case back is constructed with titanium with black DLC, six screws and a visible grinder through the open sapphire case-back. Similar to the Aventurine, the Freak S also debuts its own sparkly rendition of a starry night. The Freak S is limited to 75 pieces of which only 40 will go into production in 2022 for $260 USD.

Ulysse Nardin Marine Mega Yacht

Monaco, September 22, 2021 – A leading manufacturer of navigational instruments since 1846 the Swiss watch manufacturer’s favourite playground has always been the Ocean. For the past 175 years, Ulysse Nardin has been living, breathing, growing and creating new timepieces to reflect the rhythm of the waves and the sea. This year, to celebrate its 175th anniversary, the company is offering two new limited editions of its DIVER and MARINE Megayacht watches, both inspired by the Ocean and enhanced with new colours touches of red and a special “Monaco Yacht Show” signature for the DIVER, and rose gold instead of platinum for the MARINE Megayacht.
The Ulysse Nardin Marine Mega Yacht Show and Ulysse Nardin, the Show’s official sponsor for over 10 years, share a passion for the sea, for Excellence, for precision and for innovation. After a “year off”, the Monaco Yacht Show is back in action and will once again welcome lovers of sumptuous yachts, incredible destinations and luxury getaways in Port Hercules at the end of September. In this idyllic Mediterranean setting, Ulysse Nardin presents two new models, the Diver Monaco Yacht Show watches and the rose gold version of its fabulous and elegant Haute Horlogerie watch, the Marine Mega Yacht. Diver and Marine are the two signature collections of Ulysse Nardin’s nautical line.
Needless to say, the Swiss Manufacture produces some of the most reliable and contemporary diving watches on the market. The new Monaco Yacht Show Limited Edition is the jewel in the crown of the DIVER collection, an ultra-resistant model that does not falter in the face of any attack, even from the most ferocious sharks. The limited-edition, available in only 100 pieces, has a sapphire caseback and is driven by the Manufacture UN 150 automatic movement with silicium and a 48-hour power reserve. The model is also adorned with touches of red from the bezel joint and the seconds hand, to the hands-on the small counters and the date. Also, the “ Ulysse Nardin Marine Mega Yacht ” signature is featured under the Ulysse Nardin logo. The case, the bezel and the UN element are made of titanium and the bezel is coated with rubber. Naturally, this model has all the features of a diver’s watch ultra-resistant sapphire crystal, screw-down crown, Superluminova on the O, rotating inverted bezel for optimal readability, even in the deepest waters, and water-resistant down to 300 meters. There are several strap options rubber, metal or fabric with a Velcro fastener.
Launched in 2017, the Marine Torpilleur model encompasses the origins and history of Ulysse Nardin. It is the latest addition to the long line of prestigious timepieces in the Marine collection, which dates back to the 19th century when explorers travelled the oceans with the help of their onboard chronometers. Today, the Marine Torpilleur is the watch that best symbolizes this innovative and cutting edge style. This year, to celebrate its 175th anniversary, Ulysse Nardin has supplemented its Marine Torpilleur collection with two new movements, details, chronographs and enamel dials. But also a new Marine Megayacht in rose gold, to complement the 2019 platinum version.

Built in the same spirit as a luxury Ulysse Nardin Marine Mega Yacht , the new Marine Mega Yacht watch, crafted in pink gold in a special edition of only 30 pieces, is regulated by a flying tourbillon equipped with a cage modelled on a latest-generation ship’s propeller. Intimately linked to the concept of the mega yacht, this timepiece displays on its 3 D “grand feu” enamel dial, reminiscent of a ship’s bow plowing its way through the ocean waves, not only the time but also a precise representation of the Moon with an ultra-detailed surface, a sophisticated tide indicator across its width, together with an anchor raised by a chain attached to a windlass positioned at 12 o’clock indicating the power reserve.
With its diameter of 44 mm, this instrument displays on its dial the streamlined bows of a luxury vessel. Magnificently reproduced in 3D, it seems to surface from a pool of white gold as though it were emerging from the mist, and cuts through a sea of “Grand Feu” Enamel on a wave of foam portrayed with astonishing realism. To guarantee perfect timing, this construction is regulated by a flying tourbillon. To ensure the watch is firmly anchored in the nautical world, the cage of the flying tourbillon is decorated with a propeller with its blades specially honed to guarantee the highest level of performance for the latest generation yachts. And since every detail counts, the hands, with their design inspired by the venerable marine timepieces that the Manufacture has always supplied, move majestically above this scene, like the lamps of lighthouses or buoys floating on the horizon out at sea. This powerful beating heart of the watch has a diameter of 37 mm, features 504 components and is wound by hand. It guarantees a power reserve of 80 hours at a cruising speed of 21,600 vibrations per hour, with the tourbillon rotating at 60 rotations per hour (or one rotation every 60 seconds). Its first role is to provide an analogue time display, giving a three-dimensional presentation of the phases of the Moon and containing a mechanism that displays the height of the tides in real-time in relation to a specific location, in addition to indicating the seasonal coefficients, once the mechanism has been adjusted by the action of the winding crown, the position of which is measured in a window opened up in the side of the watch band in the same way as the screen of an exercise telegraph. Since watchmaking is above all an art form, the anchor, with its contemporary design fashioned in the form of a plowshare, linked to the chain by the anchor ring (and which itself passes through a mooring chock which might have been thought to be entirely decorative), moves in response to the movements of the winding crown so as to indicate the power reserve. Keen to be as realistic as possible, Ulysse Nardin has perfected an authentic miniature windlass, visible at 12 o’clock.

Through the action of a set of conical wheels in contact with the winding mechanism of the barrel, the latter turns to simulate the raising of the anchor, even when the winding process has been fully completed, for the pleasure of any curious observers.

The display of the phases of the Moon is made with the aid of a precise 3D reduced size representation of Earth’s satellite, and which, in order to make a special impact, presents a surface reminiscent of the Moon’s actual surface by reproducing it through the use of an ultra-precise engraving. It is made up of two half-spheres, one treated in blue PVD (for the period of the new Moon) and the other rhodiumized (to simulate the illuminating effect of the Sun). Its adjustment in relation to the annual calendar is undertaken through the winding crown, once its indicator is in place on the telegraph window opened up in the side of the watchband is placed on the corresponding indication (S Set position for setting the hands/TM Tide and Moon position/W position for winding the movement). In the intermediate position, the Moon phase and tide volume indication is regulated by turning the crown counterclockwise (one turn of the crown represents four days), while in the clockwise direction the operator regulates the level of the tide depending on his location (one turn of the crown represents a 0 25 turn of the disk, equivalent to 9 5 hours).

This watch is certainly the only one of its kind, and should offer its 30 future owners a way to follow the manoeuvres made by the crew of their yacht, the name or motto of which may be engraved in the plaque positioned on the side of the watch band so as to make it truly unique.

Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Chronometer

Aside from perhaps the Freak, Ulysse Nardin’s Marine Chronometer is without a doubt the brand’s most recognizable model. And indeed it should be, for when Ulysse Nardin first established his workshop in 1846, he set his sights on producing the finest marine chronometers the world had ever seen. Through the rest of the 19th and early 20th centuries, Ulysse Nardin’s superbly accurate chronometers became indispensable tools for over 50 navies worldwide. In 1996, for the brand’s 150th anniversary, the marine chronometer aesthetic finally made its way into a wristwatch.

In the 25 years since then, the Marine Chronometer has proven to be a very successful style indeed. These days, Ulysse Nardin‘s standard Marine Chronometer features a 43mm case, blocky lugs, an integrated strap, luminescent hands and numerals, a rubberized crown insert, rectangular crown guards, and 100m of water resistance. These rather sporty specs make Ulysse Nardin’s iconic offering an equally capable companion for both the weekend water-dweller and the business-casual bachelor. Their distinctive dials, however, with large Roman numerals, pear hands, sub-seconds, and power reserve indicator, echo an aesthetic formula that has stood the tests of time.
For those seeking a traditional approach to the Marine Chronometer without such rugged features, the Marine Torpilleur sails to the rescue. Originally released in 2017, the Torpilleur gives off a decidedly more restrained air than its sporty sibling. While it provides a dressier look, the Marine Torpilleur reigns in the specs just enough, without sacrificing the most critical Marine Chronometer elements. Ulysse Nardin’s latest limited-edition additions (limited additions?) to the collection introduce a few new color combinations, complications, and materials to the Torpilleur line. 2021 marks the brand’s 175th anniversary. This being no small occasion, Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Chronometer aims to highlight some of its most characteristic manufacturing techniques and best innovations of the last two decades with these seven new offerings. Let’s dive in and check them out!
Marine Torpilleur Panda and Blue Enamel in stainless steel
In both their cases and complications, these two Marine Torpilleur models are the foundation of the new lineup. In comparison to the standard Marine Chronometer, they feature slightly shrunken cases. Ulysse Nardin reduced them from 43mm to 42mm in diameter and from 51mm to 49mm lug-to-lug. At just 11.13mm in height, they remain quite slim indeed. Instead of the sporty, blocky lugs and integrated straps, the Torpilleur models feature traditional lugs with a 21mm spacing. The tops of the lugs are brushed, while the sides of the case, lugs, and bezel all have a mirror finish. The rubber crown insert and crown guards from the sportier model are now gone, having been swapped for an all-steel, unencumbered crown. Water resistance has also been scaled back from 100m to 50m.
The traditional Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Chronometer elements, however, are all present. The cases retain their deck-clock-inspired shape and ribbed-edge bezels. Large Roman numerals, a proud sub-seconds indicator and date window at six o’clock, and a smaller power reserve indicator at 12 o’clock give the dial its unmistakable, historical look. In contrast to the standard Marine Chronometer, however, the Torpilleur features no luminescence at all. Rather, the Roman numerals are printed, contrasting the white and blue dials. The silver pear hands on both models feature a highly polished rhodium finish.
While these two models offer nothing new in terms of complications, they do bring some new aesthetic details to the collection. The Panda edition marks the first time (to my knowledge) that the Marine Chronometer has ever had contrasting sub-dials. For fans of legibility, navy blue sub-dials on a white varnish backdrop are a welcomed addition. The Panda’s blue Roman numerals are also a departure from the line’s standard black ones.

Donzé Cadran, the brand’s now-in-house dial manufacture, produced the dial of the Blue Enamel variant. As Ulysse Nardin sees enameling as one of the brand’s most signature artforms, the dial is fired in true “Grand Feu” fashion. Masters apply layer upon layer of enamel dust on a copper base, firing it in a kiln between 760 and 900°C between each one. If you’d like to read more about how these dials are made, check out this article on WatchTime.
The basic Torpilleur models run on Ulysse Nardin‘s manufacture UN-118 caliber. In terms of specs, the movement is quite a nice one indeed. The chronometer-certified, 50-jewel caliber features central hour and minutes, sub-seconds and power reserve indicators, and a quick-set date that can be adjusted both forward and backward. Interestingly, that’s a pretty uncommon feature. Caliber UN-118 beats at 28,800vph and has 60 hours of power reserve. Though the finishing is done by machine, it is quite beautiful. The anchor-shaped rotor features an aged, patina-like weathered finish with raised, highly polished edges and two miniature beveled anchors. All visible screws are blue. While the mainplate is home to generous amounts of perlage, the bridges feature a unique radial striping pattern. Vertical “Geneva stripes” have become nearly an expectation in finishing these days. Circular striping, however, is significantly less common.

In addition to its tasteful finishing, the UN-118 caliber also has a few technical tricks up its sleeve. As the first watch company to pioneer the use of silicon components in 2001, Ulysse Nardin is extremely proud of its silicium hairspring, DIAMonSIL (diamond-coated silicium) escapement, and variable-inertia balance wheel. While “silicium” is actually just an obsolete term for silicon, the brand may use it to avoid negative connotations with cheapness, or even confusion with silicone (no, they are not the same). Regardless, silicon escapements have clear advantages over traditional metal ones. Silicon is light, antimagnetic, and it requires no lubrication. A machine can also cut silicon to tolerances exponentially finer than metal — down to fractions of a micron! As such, escapements with silicon components are not only less prone to wear and magnetism, but they also will require fewer fine, costly adjustments over time.
These models feature the exact same case specifications as the Torpilleur models above, so no need to rehash those here. The main differences on these Moonphase models are the dials, hands, movements, and of course, the additional complication. The movement in this model is the brand new caliber UN-119. This 45-jewel manufacture caliber also runs at 28,800vph, has a power reserve of 60 hours, and is a COSC-certified chronometer. Like the rest of the movements in the Torpilleur collection, UN-119 also features Ulysse Nardin‘s signature silicon escapement and balance spring for added reliability. In exchange for the date indicator, a moonphase fits beautifully within the small seconds sub-dial at six o’clock. The blue night sky is a PVD finish, with silver three-dimensional moon and stars.

While the white dial of the Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Chronometer Moonphase features the same white varnish and blue Roman numerals as the model above, all four of the hands have been thermally blued. The color complements the blue of the moonphase disc quite nicely, if I may say so myself. The blue dial of the Torpilleur Moonphase is not enamel, but rather, a blue, sunburst PVD finish. High-polished, rhodium-plated hands carry over from the base model. Not only does this model feature a brand new movement, but as far as my research suggests, this is also the first time we’ve ever seen a moonphase complication in the Marine line.
Marine Torpilleur Annual Chronograph
With these models, Ulysse Nardin takes a few steps up the ladder of complications. The UN-153 manufacture caliber inside the Torpilleur Annual Chronograph echoes most of the tech and basic specs of the UN-118 and 119, the obvious difference being its chronograph and annual calendar functions. The brand does not specify whether this movement is COSC-certified. I will assume it is not. It is, however, a fully integrated column-wheel chronograph, capable of timing up to 30 minutes. It also features an annual calendar module by Ludwig Oechslin. The annual calendar complication requires manual adjustment just once a year, on March 1st. Oeschlin is responsible for democratizing this complication (which you can read more about here). Thanks to his module’s simplified construction, one can adjust both the date and the month forward and backward without the risk of damage.

As with the previous models, the dials of Torpilleur Annual Chronograph come in both white and blue. Just like the Torpilleur Moonphase, the white dial of the Annual Chronograph features blue Roman numerals on a white varnish backdrop. The sub-dials, however, have a silvered finish. All of the hands are thermally blued as well. While the blue dial variant features white printing just like the previous models, the blue color is a matte, rather than sunburst, PVD finish. Another really nice touch is the gold chronograph and month hands. Their warm hue contrasts the rhodium-plated hour and minute hands beautifully
Ulysse Nardin takes pride in its history as a chronograph maker. The brand originally produced Chronograph Marine Torpilleur pocket watches from 1936 to 1980. Officials at the 1936 Berlin Olympics even used them, as they were able to measure time to 1/10th of a second. The UN-153 movement has seen action in the standard Marine for quite some time now. This is the first time, however, that we’ve seen a chronograph offered in the modern-day Marine Torpilleur wristwatch. To me, the option makes good, logical sense.

The head-scratcher for me, however, is the case size. Ulysse Nardin actually scaled it up from 42 to 44mm. That makes it even 1mm larger in diameter than its standard Marine Chronograph counterpart. Perhaps this is a historical nod to the Torpilleur chronograph pocket watches old? Thankfully, at least, the circular pump pushers suit the more classic design rather nicely. While I can’t quite wrap my head around the larger diameter, the case does remain nearly a millimeter and a half thinner than the standard Marine Chronograph, at 13.66mm in thickness.
Marine Torpilleur Tourbillon Grand Feu — the king’s crown of the bunch
Continuing its long, illustrious tradition of tourbillon manufacturing, Ulysse Nardin pulls out all the stops with the Marine Torpilleur Tourbillon. The UN-128 caliber in this watch has a flying tourbillon, but not just any flying tourbillon, oh no. The caliber features UN’s proprietary silicon constant force escapement. This innovative solution does away with traditional Swiss lever/pallet escapement construction. Instead of a pallet staff, it uses two thin silicon blades that naturally flex with each oscillation of the balance wheel. These blades push the arms of the pallet to lock and unlock the escape wheel. I know we’re getting a bit technical here, but suffice it to say, this escapement is revolutionary. It results in much less energy loss than a standard metal lever escapement. This gives the movement constant torque and therefore better accuracy throughout its entire power reserve.

You can see this escapement in action here and, if you’re up for it, read an in-depth analysis here. Aside from its obviously higher-end complication, caliber UN-128 differs from those previously mentioned with its significantly slower 18,000vph frequency. It does retain, however, the 60-hour power reserve of all the other Marine Torpilleur models, as well as the power reserve indicator. Yes, one must forego the traditional, closed sub-seconds indicator. Honestly, though, that’s quite a small sacrifice considering since the tourbillon doubles as a seconds hand.
Unlike the Torpilleur Annual Chronograph, the Torpilleur Tourbillon features basically the same 42mm case size as its other steel stablemates. It is just slightly taller at 11.93mm in thickness. Of course, the other noticeable difference is its 5N rose gold construction. The rose gold hands match the case perfectly, and they sit above a black Grand Feu enamel dial. While Ulysse Nardin has made standard Marine Tourbillons with both white and blue Grand Feu dials, I believe this is the first black enamel variant in the Marine line. It is also the first tourbillon ever in the Torpilleur case.

Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Moonphase

When we talk about Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Moonphase watches and space it’s usually about watches in space, but there’s an obvious connection between horology and celestial bodies, and one way it’s been manifested is in the form of the moonphase complication. Ulysse Nardin has just released four new references in their Marine Torpilleur collection that put this complication on full display. Ulysse Nardin has historically focused on moonphase clocks and watches; the complication fits nicely into their elegant and polished design language, which seems largely unchanged from the brand’s inception in 1846. Ulysse Nardin forged a reputation for its prowess in manufacturing marine chronometers for naval use, and of course, sea tides are dependent on the moon. James Nardin, cousin of Ulysse Nardin, was creating pocket watches with moonphase complications as far back as the 1880s.
The new Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Moonphase comes in two variations: One with a white dial, and one with a blue dial. The dial color selection stems from the long history of Ulysse Nardin’s ties to horological traditions involving the moon and the sea. The blue dial is created with a sun-brushed PVD coating, and the white dial is varnished. The stainless steel case measures 42 millimeters, and inside is the manufacturer caliber UN-119, with a balance wheel in Silicium and escapement wheel in Diamonsil that contribute to a 60-hour power reserve. The whole package is water-resistant to 50 meters, enough to comfortably practice celestial navigation at sea using the watch and a sextant, like the Ulysse Nardin wearers of yore.
There are four total references, two with a blue dial, 1193-310LE-3A-175/1A(with a blue strap) and 1193-310LE-3A-175/1B(with a brown strap), and then two with a white dial, 1193-310LE-0A-175/1A (with a blue strap) and 1193-310LE-0A-175/1b (with a brown strap). There will be 150 examples of each made, and they’re priced at $9,900. The caliber UN-119 features the functions of hours, minutes, small seconds, and of course, moonphase. It beats at 28,800 vph, and it employs 45 jewels. The stainless steel case is 42mm, and features polished and satin finishes. The watches will be available at Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur Moonphase authorized dealers.

Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur

Grand feu enamel dials, chronographs and high complications were on the menu at Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur for Geneva Watch Days, the micro watch fair taking place this week in Switzerland. Like Bulgari, Ulysse Nardin is a founding partner of the show and, while it only focused on one collection, presented five new models for its Marine Torpilleur collection. All come equipped with Silicium escapements (the company was among the first to use the material in 2001 on its Freak model) and are marked with the signature “Chronometry since 1846” to herald Ulysse Nardin’s 175th anniversary.
The newest generation of Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur chronometers debuted in 2017, as a lighter and thinner iteration of the brand’s Marine Chronometer. Today’s additions provide a range of options for collectors in the market for a dress watch in variations on sizing, complications and elegant dial techniques and designs.
While the highlight of this watch is the patented constant escapement tourbillon at 6 o’clock, which took home the Tourbillon Watch Prize at the GPHG (or Oscar’s of watchmaking) in 2015, the dial should not be overlooked. Over 90 percent handmade, it comes in elite black grand feu enamel executed by the enameling workshop, Donzé Cadrans, which was acquired by Ulysse Nardin in 2011. It also comes with oversize white Roman numerals and a power reserve indicator at 12 o’clock. It is, appropriately, set within a 5N rose-gold case that has been polished and satin-finished and has a fluted bezel. At $48,400 and limited to 175 pieces, this 42 mm by 11.93 mm watch is the priciest offering in the new lineup.
Two Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur versions ($12,100), in varnished white or a matte blue dial set in steel cases with fluted bezels, improve upon independent watchmaker Ludwig Oechslin’s 1996 annual calendar system with improvements to the settings, which can now be adjusted by turning the crown forward or backward for an easier setting of the time and date. The chronograph counter is displayed at 3 o’clock, while the annual calendar and small seconds are indicated in a subdial at 9 o’clock. At 44 mm by 13.66 mm, this is the largest watch in the new collection—a lot of space is needed to pack in the components required to build an annual chronograph—and it is limited to 300 pieces each.
Singing the blues! This striking grand feu blue enamel dial, also handmade by Donzé Cadrans, sets it apart from its brother, the Marine Torpielleur Panda (below). It features contrasting and rather prominent white Roman numerals, along with cathedral hands. It is equipped with the UN-118 caliber with 60 hours of power reserve, indicated at 12 o’clock with a larger subdial at 6 o’clock for the seconds and date window. The 42 mm by 11.3 mm stainless steel timepiece is limited to 175 pieces ($8,200).
This is the first iteration of a Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur dial at Ulysse Nardin. The Swiss watchmaker’s interpretation of the popular dial design—nicknamed for the bear due to its two dark eyes or counters, usually in a horizontal layout in the center of a white dial—and flips tradition in a vertical arrangement of the counters in the same fashion as the Marine Torpilleur Blue Enamel. Here, the blue subdials stand out against a white dial with blue oversize Roman numerals. Also equipped with the UN-118 caliber set within a 43 mm by 11.3 mm stainless steel case, this is essentially the same watch as above without the grand feu enameling and in a different colorway but is offered in 300 pieces ($8,200).
Finally, a moonphase version of the Ulysse Nardin Marine Torpilleur ($9,900) is offered in either a blue sun-brushed PVD or varnished white dial set in a 42 mm by 11.13 mm stainless steel case with a fluted bezel. It is powered by the caliber UN-119, an automatic COSC-certified movement with 60 hours of power reserved indicated at 12 o’clock. Just beneath, at 6 o’clock, is the moonphase set within a subdial that also reads the small seconds. The moon is made with a multi-layer decal, while the starry sky is made of blue PVD. Both versions are limited to 300 each.

Ulysse Nardin Tourbillon Ulysse Anchor

The quintessence of mechanical technology timelessly arrayed in gold and enamel, this new model incorporates the constant Ulysse Anchor Escapement, a constant force escapement with a design that breaks completely with the traditional watchmaking approach. A break-away current, the kind of waters where Ulysse Nardin Tourbillon Ulysse Anchor loves to sail.

Driven by the unending quest for innovation that makes it one of the most dynamic Manufactures, in 2015 Ulysse Nardin dropped a new marker buoy on the capricious ocean of fine watchmaking. An undisputed world first, the new Ulysse Anchor Tourbillon is the quintessence of avant-garde mechanical technology, timelessly arrayed in gold and enamel. The outcome of eight years of research and development, the constant Ulysse Anchor escapement, made entirely of silicium, displays hitherto unknown architecture based on the principle of flexible mechanisms exploiting the elasticity of flat springs. This device, the culmination of the development work on the prototype version presented in 2014, represents the height of timekeeping sophistication today: first, no longer constrained by a pivoting staff, the pallet fork moves entirely without friction; second, the geometrical improvements made to the pallet fork, the escape wheel and the flat springs have resulted in a constant-force escapement; and to crown all of this, this new coinage in watchmaking is brought aboard in a tourbillon cage, the peak of traditional expertise.

Ulysse Nardin has always been driven by a pioneering spirit: in 2001, the Manufacture was the first to develop an escapement made of silicium; it was the first to test a diamond balance spring in 2002; the first to use silicium for its Dual Ulysse escapement – a phenomenon in its own right – in 2005; the first to fit a watch with a diamond escapement, also in 2005; and lastly, the first to use silicium as a kernel for growing diamonds, DIAMonSIL.

In collaboration with Sigatec, a co-owned company specializing in the production of silicium micro-components, the Le Locle-based company spent no less than eight years perfecting this mechanism, which today appears to be a paradigm shift in the approach to mechanical watchmaking. Challenging the principle of the traditional Swiss anchor escapement, the new constant Ulysse Anchor escapement features a circular frame with a pallet fork fixed in the center, supported in space on two blade springs less than a tenth of the thickness of a hair in diameter. Mounted perpendicular to each other, these are subjected to a bending force that curves them and maintains them in a bi-stable state.

This complex structure, made entirely of silicium thanks to the DRIE deep etching technique, exploits the physical capacity of blade springs to become distorted along the left-right axis while remaining perfectly rigid along the up-down axis, thus reproducing the kinetic functions of a pivot. The impulse that issues from each alternation of the balance wheel thus transmits its energy to the blades, which snap from one stable state to the other, very much like a snap hair-clip. The pallet arms thus pivot backwards and forwards about a pallet staff that is purely virtual, without generating any frictional forces.

But the best is yet to come: the redesigned pallet fork now possesses an integral resetting face. As the tooth of the escape wheel slides along this surface as far as the banking face, it will bring the pallet fork back every time to within just 3° of the center line – that is, the imaginary straight line between the center of the balance wheel and the center of the escape wheel which defines the system’s equilibrium limit. Thus the effort that the balance wheel has to exert to push the pallet fork as far as its tipping point is less than the effort that is restored to it immediately afterwards by the bending of the blade springs. In this way, this positive energy balance is able to maintain the oscillations of the balance wheel at a constant rate. In fact, this interplay of forces is not influenced by the motor torque injected into the escape wheel, which only starts to move once the pallet fork has switched over.

In a final touch of artistry, this astonishing construction is housed in a 60-seconds tourbillon, whose cage comprises 35 components but weighs no more than 0.4 grams. With its constant amplitude, irrespective of how much the two series-mounted spring barrels are wound, this exceptional oscillating mechanism is a major step forward in the field of chronometric accuracy. Visible through a large opening in the dial at 6 o’clock, it is encircled by the indication of its power reserve of at least 7 days on a 140° arc.

This caliber UN-178 is housed in a rose gold or white gold case in the Classico collection. A setting with traditional lines enhanced with a white Grand Feu enamel dial created by the unrivaled expertise of Donzé Cadrans, a dial-making specialist company owned by Ulysse Nardin. Available in two limited editions of 18 pieces each, the Ulysse Anchor Tourbillon will be in the retailers’ display windows from May.