Girard-Perregaux Laureato 42mm

This is the Girard-Perregaux Laureato 42 Automatic. And it’s something of a unicorn. By which I mean it’s a luxury steel sports watch. On an integrated steel bracelet. From a reputable brand. With decent heritage. But which the internet is not losing its mind about. As a result, it actually trades at below retail on the secondary market. Not by much mind you. Still, you can see how it might be more attractive than paying over four times retail for a competitor. But does it deliver the same bang for your buck? Let’s get into it and find out if the Girard-Perregaux Laureato 42 actually is a great buy.
Like all good luxury steel sports watches, the Girard-Perregaux Laureato 42 traces its origins to the 1970s. 1975 to be specific. Three years after Gerald Genta and Audermars Piguet created the genre-defining Royal Oak. As I’m sure you’re already aware, Genta was also responsible for the design of the Patek Nautilus. Although that came out the year after the Laureato. As did the Vacheron Constantin 222, which was the work of a young Jorg Hysek.
A celebrated watch designer wasn’t behind the design of the Laureato though. Instead, Girard-Perregaux chose to work with a Milanese architect for the design. That’s not a knock mind you. It’s clear he did a fantastic job. But I do wonder if this in some way impacts collectors’ perceptions of the Laureato. The name of which was suggested by GP’s Italian distributor. It translates to the Graduate in English. Someone was a Mike Nichols/Dustin Hoffman fan it seems.

The case design is at once familiar yet unique. And very fitting for the period. There’s the combination of octagonal and round shapes for the bezel. The slim case profile. And of course, the integrated bracelet. But what sets the Laureato apart is the way the sides of the octagon slope down. And the clever use of convex and concave surfaces. It makes everything look more, well, architectural. Genta drew inspiration from old-fashioned diving helmets for his creations. GP’s architect meanwhile looked to the dome of the famed Florence Cathedral.
There’s something else that set the Laureato apart from its peers at the time though. And which may go part way to explaining why it’s not viewed in the same light today. While AP et al all opted for slim mechanical movements, GP chose to debut a new quartz movement instead. But not any old quartz movement. The new Calibre 705. An in-house developed chronometer that was progressive for its time. Something that could deliver both accuracy and reliability in a slim package.
It may surprise you to learn that GP played an important role in developing quartz movements. In 1971, the company released the GP-350. The first movement to have a quartz crystal vibrating at 32,768 Hz. The frequency that would go on to become the industry standard. At the time, its accuracy was without parallel. One minute’s error per year!
Viewed in that light, the choice of quartz movement makes a lot more sense. This sleek and modern timekeeper was popular with the younger crowd it was targeting. Much like the Rolex Datejust OysterQuartz that followed two years later. And so, it was almost 20 years before GP decided to add in a mechanical movement. The new (at the time) manufacture calibre 3000. As part of this upgrade, GP redesigned the case of Laureato. It needed to be bigger to accommodate the new movement, albeit with a slimmer profile. To keep everything in proportion the bezel was also made thicker. And the links of the integrated bracelet took on the “H” shape we see on the current model.

Further iterations would follow with GP changing the case and movement again in 2003. It got even bigger – 44mm – and introduced a strip of rubber in-between the case and the bezel. Akin to the Royal Oak Offshore. But evidently it never found its mark and GP ceased production on the Laureato a short while later.
After a long hiatus, it seems GP was ready to reintroduce the world to the Laureato once again. But the brand wasn’t sure how the market would receive it. So, it devised a clever ploy. The year 2016 marked GP’s 225th anniversary (!!). The perfect opportunity to debut several special models to mark the occasion. Among them was the Laureato Ref 81000. A limited edition of 225 pieces in each of two dial colours (blue and silver).

This new model did not pick up where things left off back in the mid-2000s with the EVO3 though. Instead it marked a welcome and refreshing return to something resembling the original. Smaller case (41mm). Slimmer profile (10.1mm). And attractive if plain dials with a lovely clous de Paris (hobnail) pattern. This was much more in the vein of the luxury steel sports watch we’re used to.
Inside was the GP caliber 3300-0030. A decent, in-house self-winding movement delivering a 46 hour power reserve. Although at 25.6mm in diameter it must have been swimming in the 41mm case. There was also the issue of price. At US$14,300, this limited edition Laureato was venturing into Royal Oak territory. (At that time, at least!) A bold bid by GP but one that the watch itself couldn’t quite back up. There was also the small matter of the GP 1966 40mm Automatic in steel.

GP had debuted that watch a year earlier. A clean and attractive dress watch on a leather strap or matching bracelet. So, why does that matter to the Laureato? Well, the 1966 used the exact same movement and offered the same functionality. But it cost US$8,200 on a bracelet. There’s no doubt the case of the Laureato was more complex. And it was a special edition. But watch enthusiasts still had a hard time swallowing the $6k price difference.

This wasn’t a crash and burn situation so to speak. Far from it as the model definitely got people’s attention. But there were lessons to learn. And credit to GP for paying attention to the feedback. Rather than mothballing the Laureato again, they went back to the drawing board.
The next year, GP launched the Laureato as a full collection. Among the new models was the Laureato 42 Automatic. A subtle evolution of the anniversary edition. The case gets a little bigger at 42mm. And was available in steel, titanium and titanium/pink gold. Although GP later changed to steel only. And added a full black ceramic version. It also got a new movement in the form of the upgraded GP01800-0008 automatic. Not only did it do a better job of filling the case, but it also increased the power reserve to 54 hours.
In the eyes of collectors, the Girard-Perregaux Laureato 42 suffers from something of an identity crisis. As does GP as a whole for that matter. Patek and AP and the like tend to keep their classic luxury steel sports watches very uniform. For the most part, there is a clear thread carried through from each model’s origin until today. GP meanwhile has opted to go more for the Hublot approach. Meaning lots of variation on the same theme. Hi-tech case materials. And a hearty helping of ‘special’ editions. It doesn’t help as well that GP couldn’t seem to get the formula right in the past. Meaning lots of evolutions of the collection over the years. Not all of it pretty.
There’s nothing wrong with a bit of variety, of course. And there’s nothing that says GP has to follow the traditional blueprint for integrated steel sports watches from the ’70s. That said, it does mean the Girard-Perregaux Laureato 42 will never get the title of a collectible watch. Does that matter? Depends on what you’re looking for, I suppose. Is it a great watch? With an interesting and well-executed design? From an integrated manufacturer with serious history and a top reputation for quality? The answer is yes, yes and yes!

A lot of people still sleep on GP because the brand has not marketed itself as well as its competitors. Its pricing has sometimes – ok, a lot of the time – been a little out of kilter. And it’s made some made poor decisions in the past about product mix and design. Regardless, they still know how to make high-quality watches. And well-regarded in-house movements.

So, let’s put the mixed (troubled?) past of the Laureato aside for the moment. Instead, we’ll judge it only on its merits today. (What a novel concept!) What you get is a stylish, well-constructed luxury steel sports. With a manufacture movement. And an integrated steel bracelet. For around US$10k. Assuming you buy on the secondary market. Or get a discount from your AD. And make no mistake, you can actually buy this watch. There are no ridiculous waiting lists. Or insane premium pricing. Those things alone are worth giving the Laureato a second look. Aside from the fact that it’s also a pretty decent watch in its own right.

Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute

The inaugural version of the Girard-Perregaux Laureato was released in 1975. From the outset, it embraced a new, highly original design language. Indeed, the masterful play with shapes, such as juxtaposing the octagonal bezel with circular forms and straight lines, infused the model with a distinctly sporty appearance, albeit with a sizeable quotient of elegance. With the advent of the Laureato, a legend was born.

In 2019, Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute released three contemporary novelties, with a very familiar look, forming what is now known as the Laureato Absolute sub-family. Each version was an evolution of the original Laureato, albeit with an overtly muscular torso and presented in a shade of brooding black. The models were suited to an adventurous lifestyle, manifest with their impressive water resistance of 300 metres. Now, the Manufacture has continued to develop the Laureato Absolute offering, releasing the Laureato Absolute Gold Fever. Once again, Girard-Perregaux has combined two seemingly disparate elements, day-to-day practicality with deliciously decadent pink gold components.
Often a watch is sporty or elegant, but seldom both. However, the Laureato of 1975 set aside this notion with its distinctive and legendary appearance. Indeed, Girard-Perregaux has always had a remarkable capacity for uniting two contrasting characteristics. The Laureato Absolute Gold Fever blends bold styling and practicality with a useful chronograph complication and luxurious touches of pink gold.

Measuring 44mm in diameter, the Grade 5 titanium case proffers much wrist presence but with a welcome absence of mass. The case is suffused with black PVD and encompasses a blend of straight and circular satin finished surfaces along with polished edges. Unusually for a watch that is not dedicated to diving, the model has an impressive water resistance of 300 metres. The caseback is secured with six screws and engraved with the Laureato Absolute logo, a characteristic found on the first models launched in 2019.
Consistent with several other Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute models, the Gold Fever incorporates a sandwich dial. Where many watches have indexes applied upon the main dial membrane, the dial on this watch adopts a more unusual approach. The black upper dial has cut-out baton-shaped indexes and subdials, affording sight of a lower plate formed from 18K pink gold. By adopting this design, the dial masterfully plays with depths, augmenting visual interest while at the same time delivering impressive readability. The use of 18K pink gold extends to the hour and minute hands as well as the applied GP logo and the three counters gracing the dial.

Currently celebrating its 230th anniversary, Girard-Perregaux is a company rich in history. However, it has never shied away from exploring cutting-edge technology. In this instance, the Manufacture has endowed the Laureato Absolute Gold Fever with an innovative high-tech rubber strap, made of Girard-Perregaux Rubber Alloy suffused with pink gold for the first time. Made from FKM rubber, the strap is injected with 18K pink gold and features a fabric effect appearance. Consistent with the company’s no-compromise attitude, the FKM rubber delivers greater suppleness and resistance than conventional rubber. Moreover, the specification of the strap with its addition of noble metal bestows a sumptuous look and tactility. Similar to the Laureato of 1975, the strap affixed to this model is integrated, smoothly flowing into the case. The strap is fitted with a titanium folding clasp equipped with a micro-adjustment system which allows the wearer to fine tune the size, thereby granting the perfect ergonomic fit.
Patrick Pruniaux, CEO of Girard-Perregaux, remarks, “The Laureato Absolute Gold Fever wonderfully showcases a marriage of materials and plays with depths to deliver a sublime combination. Furthermore, by working with Revolution and The Rake, we are extending our innovative spirit to the distribution of our products, what’s more, directly to their audience of connaisseurs that is clearly “in the know”. We have known Wei Koh, the founder of both platforms, for a number of years and he was an obvious choice for this partnership.”

Wei Koh, founder of Revolution & The Rake, added, “My Laureato Crystal Rock has made me into a Laureato convert, and I immediately asked the Girard-Perregaux team to let me know of any other cool launches they might have planned. That’s when they approached me about a collaboration on their latest model, the Laureato Absolute Gold Fever. What I like about it is the dynamic contrast to the 44mm blacked-out titanium case represented by the very targeted use of pink gold. The GP logo, the hands, the indexes and the counters are all 18K pink gold, and the dial’s multi-level sandwich construction creates a really nice sense of depth. And while, in absolute terms, this is not a lot of gold, the overall effect is one that endows the Gold Fever with a kind of louche, seductive opulence.”

The Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Gold Fever is a limited edition of 188 pieces and will be sold exclusively by Revolution and The Rake on their respective e-commerce platforms as of 15 November 2021 for a period of two months. Thereafter, the model will be available in all authorised Girard­ Perregaux retailers and on the brand’s e-commerce site.

Girard-Perregaux Laureato Automatic

Watch collectors had been awaiting its return. After a lengthy hiatus, which saw almost 30 different references, Girard-Perregaux Laureato Automatic finally brought the Laureato back into its collection in 2017. It had already made its comeback one year earlier with various limited editions commemorating Girard-Perregaux’s 225th anniversary. One of the latest models to join the family is this blue-dialed take on the fourth-generation Laureato, which we recently had the opportunity to spend some wrist time with. A look back leads to the 1970s, a decade when the watch industry was responding to a demand for sporty and elegant timepieces that had a distinctive aesthetic and could be worn for every occasion. Girard-Perregaux Laureato Automatic commissioned a Milanese architect to design the Laureato, which translates as the “graduate.” He placed an octagonal component atop a ring, thus joining a polygon and a circle. To create specific reflections of light, the sides of the octagon traced gently flowing lines rather than sharply defined edges, combined with convex and concave surfaces. The fluid transition from the case to the integrated metal bracelet followed both the taste of the time and the transformation in watch technology that Girard- Perregaux celebrated inside the Laureato in 1975: the first appearance of an uncommonly slim and compact quartz movement. This caliber defined the international standard with a frequency of 32,768 Hz. So it’s no surprise that quartz watches belong to the current Laureato collection.

Nor is it surprising to hear some sharp-tongued rogues mutter that the Laureato’s latest incarnation looks even more like Audemars Piguet’s Royal Oak, which Gérald Genta designed in 1972. With a brawny bezel and visible screws, Genta’s brainchild borrows some details from an old-fashioned diving helmet. With this timekeeping creation, the famed Swiss designer with Italian roots transformed the watch world at a time when the Milanese architect likewise followed the zeitgeist and sketched his own designs for Girard-Perregaux Laureato Automatic , which are more reminiscent of the dome atop a Florentine cathedral. The Laureato underwent its first revision in 1984. It encased a mechanical movement for the first time in 1995, when manufacture Caliber 3000 began ticking inside its case. The Laureato EVO2 was larger, its bezel broader and the links of its integrated stainless-steel bracelet shaped like the letter “H,” as are their counterparts on our contemporary test model. The case, which was formerly only available in stainless steel, now also comes in a titanium and gold version. The traditional stainless-steel bracelet is still available, but rubber straps and leather wristbands have been introduced as alternatives. In 1998, the legendary “Tourbillon Under Three Bridges” appeared in a Laureato model, proving that Girard-Perregaux’s unconventional mechanism is sturdy enough for use in a high-complication watch.

The third-generation Laureato, the EVO3, was available as a chronograph and with complications. Its lines have become gentler when compared to their counterparts on the EVO2. The interplay between satin-finished and polished elements can be seen in both the stainless-steel bracelet and the butterfly clasp with push-button closure. For the first time, the octagonal bezel is satin finished on top, while its sides and its underlying ring have a high-gloss finish. The case’s compact middle piece is brushed matte all the way to the points where it transitions into the wristband. Glossy finishing shines on the screwed back, which has a window of sapphire crystal. All these characteristics, including the case’s pressure resistance to 10 bar (100 meters), likewise distinguish our test watch, the fourth-generation Laureato. It updates its ancestors’ genetic code with a somewhat narrower bezel and a case with a slightly more angular middle piece and finely polished steps, thus assuring that this Laureato preserves its identity.

Despite the undeniably large diameter (42 mm) of its stainless-steel body, the Laureato Automatic is a mere 11 mm tall. This thinness assures that this sporty timepiece can be worn under the close-fitting cuff of a dress shirt when it accompanies its wearer on an evening at the theater. And that’s not all: The gentle lines of the case and the softly flowing feel of the linked bracelet make the Laureato a sporty and elegant companion to wear on many diverse occasions. The model is available with three different dial colors: silver, slate gray and blue, whereby the last-mentioned color, which characterizes the dial on our test watch, marks an unexpectedly long-lasting trend. The dial is decorated with a waffle-like clous de Paris pattern composed of numerous tiny pyramids, all neatly arranged in regular rank and file order. At first glance, this admittedly leads one to suspect that the Laureato has come a bit closer to the Royal Oak. But appearances are deceiving: this clous de Paris pattern is significantly different from the petite tapisserie embellishment on Audemars Piguet’s dials. Raised, luminous, hour appliqués and large, baton-shaped, glow-in-the-dark hands enhance the Laureato’s charm as a sports watch and simultaneously guarantee good legibility under all lighting conditions. The only blemish: the easy-to-read date display at 3 o’clock is black, a hue that doesn’t entirely harmonize with the blue dial. The date can be quickly reset by pulling out the well-screwed-down crown, which is easy to grasp, to its middle position and giving it a little twist. The crown’s styling emphasizes the Laureato’s character as a sports watch. But beware: even if you have observed the six-hour curfew before and after you rapidly reset the date, the date display sometimes jumps to show a wrong number when you pull the crown into its hand-setting position. Moreover, a bit of unwanted play is also noticeable in the seconds hand when the crown is in this extracted position for precise adjustment of the hands. Fortunately, this little wiggle doesn’t interfere with to-the-second time setting because the seconds hand races back to its zero position as soon as the crown is released, but the phenomenon is nonetheless unusual.

The time display is powered by automatic manufacture Caliber GP01800-0008, which has only been on the market since 2017 and is celebrating its debut inside the 42-mm models of the Laureato collection. The intention here is obvious: Caliber GP01800-0008 is 30 mm in diameter, more than 6 mm larger than the basic movement in the GP3000 series, so it fits well inside these new and larger watch models. The GP3000 was installed inside 36-mm cases when it premiered in the 1990s. And for a short time, it seemed like it almost lost itself in the Sea Hawk’s spacious 44-mm case. It is indeed a lovely sight to peer through the window of sapphire crystal, which six screws securely hold on the back of the 42-mm Laureato, and see how completely Caliber GP01800-0008 fills the interior of the case. The movement’s styling is essentially in accord with Girard-Perregaux Laureato Automatic characteristic attributes, but its design differs in a few noteworthy details. Although the rotor is ball borne, it adheres to the brand’s philosophy and winds the mainspring in only one direction of rotation (counterclockwise). The large barrel looks very handsome under a bridge of its own. A Triovis system is no longer used to finely adjust the balance: it has been replaced by an index system with an eccentric screw. This caliber was designed, fabricated and assembled in its traditional and meticulously crafted versions entirely on the brand’s premises.

As such, it delivers well-balanced and reliable performance inside the Laureato. When fully wound, it gained 3.6 seconds per day on our timing machine and 4.7 seconds per day on the wrist. All in all, these are commendable statistics for a luxury timepiece, assuming that one important number is generously overlooked: namely, the high price that Girard-Perregaux asks for this three-handed watch.

Girard-Perregaux Tourbillon with Three Gold Bridges Ruby Heart

Girard-Perregaux unveiled the Tourbillon with Girard-Perregaux Three Gold Bridges Ruby Heart that is inspired by the union of a Swiss watchmaker from the 19th century Constant Girard and his wife Marie Perregaux. The watch features an 18-carat pink gold case, and a dial carved from a ruby heart. Limited to 3 pieces, it is embellished with numerous precious stones.
Constant Girard’s most famous watch, the Girard-Perregaux Three Gold Bridges Ruby Heart , is still fabricated today in modern versions by the Swiss watch manufacturer, Girard-Perregaux. This year, the company introduced a new chapter in the brand’s story, the Tourbillon with Three Gold Bridges Ruby Heart. Its dial is carved from a ruby heart, a natural material formed within the center of a zoisite stone. Carefully selected for its quality and appearance, the ruby heart is cut into thin plates, shaped, and polished to the desired thickness.
To suit the new watch, the Girard-Perregaux Three Gold Bridges Ruby Heart were reshaped. Each bridge is hand-finished and hand-polished. They sit beneath dauphine-type hour and minute hands. The upper bridge, located at 12 o’clock, straddles the barrel, itself decorated with a hand-engraved white gold disc. Located beneath the central bridge, the wearer can see the hour wheel. The final bridge, positioned at the base of the dial, spans the tourbillon. Upholding Girard-Perregaux tradition, the tourbillon features a lyre-shaped tourbillon cage that includes 79 components and weighs only 0.3g. The low mass of the cage mitigates power consumption, contributing to the model’s impressive power reserve of at least 50 hours. A blued steel hand is affixed to the tourbillon cage and serves as a small seconds display.
The Calibre GP09600-1620 is a self-winding movement using a micro-rotor located behind the barrel. Each part is polished, chamfered, and carved out by hand to 1/100mm (the average diameter of a human hair) according to the finest traditions in watchmaking.
Formed of 18-carat pink gold, the case measures 38mm in diameter. The bezel and upper lug surfaces are set with 56 brilliant-cut diamonds ~1,25 cts. The bezel is decorated with 18 brilliant-cut rubies ~0.36 ct which are positioned adjacent to the red alligator strap. The watch is affixed to the wrist with a folding buckle presented in pink gold and set with 18 brilliant-cut diamonds ~0.20 cts. The crown is fitted with a cabochon formed of polished ruby heart.

Girard Perregaux Laureato Chronograph Aston Martin Edition

The partnership first revealed in early 2021, and indeed, genuine friendship formed between Girard-Perregaux and Aston Martin has led to the creation of a new timepiece, the   Girard Perregaux Laureato Chronograph Aston Martin Edition . Its styling masterfully plays with shapes, textures, and light, tailored to those who appreciate luxury and performance. Collectively, the two companies have over 330 years of amassed know-how, something that is evident when appraising both firms’ creations. However, while they respect their heritage, they share a resolutely forward-thinking outlook.

Back in the early 1900s, various colours were assigned to racing cars to distinguish the different nationalities of the teams. As a result, French cars were presented in blue, Italian cars were famously red, Belgian cars were yellow, German cars were silver, and British cars were dressed in British Racing Green. As a British marque, Aston Martin adopted green as its racing colour with the most famous example being the Aston Martin DBR1 that won the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1959. From that car to the modern day Formula 1

 car, Aston Martin’s racing colour has remained green.

The   Girard Perregaux Laureato Chronograph Aston Martin Edition  is the latest creation from Girard-Perregaux, made in collaboration with Aston Martin. Its dial is suffused with a delightfully decadent application of what is now known as “Aston Martin Green”, achieved by painstakingly applying paint twenty-one times to the dial, forming seven distinct layers of paint as a result. The automotive influences also encompass cross-hatching, a diamond-like pattern first seen with the ultra-luxury car manufacturer’s ‘AM’ logo (1921 – 1926). This motif was also inspired by the quilted seats found in the British brand’s numerous high-performance sports cars.

Patrick Pruniaux, CEO of Girard-Perregaux, said, ‘Our Manufacture has a long history of collaborations, beginning with our founder Jean-François Bautte who brought different “établisseurs” together under one roof, effectively creating one of the first Manufactures as we know them today.  Not only has our partnership with Aston Martin yielded two exceptional timepieces, it is indeed a meeting of the minds and marks the beginnings of a true friendship between both brands and our teams. The Laureato Chronograph Aston Martin Edition is evidence of that mutual understanding and shared philosophy.’

Marek Reichman, Aston Martin Executive Vice President and Chief Creative Officer, added: ‘As Aston Martin and Girard-Perregaux strengthen our partnership, the same is happening with our common design ethos, geared towards discreet luxury. Evidence of it continues to appear in subtle touches throughout the watch, for instance, in its partially openworked hour and minute hands, which have been purposely designed to evoke thoughts of racing cars, eschewing extraneous material to deliver superior performance. Likewise, the central chronograph seconds hand features a counterweight that resembles the sides strakes first seen on the 1958 Aston Martin DB4.’
Three counters grace the dial, two chronograph registers and a small seconds display. Each counter features a partially openworked hand, perpetuating the design of the hour and minute hands. The central section of each counter is snailed. A date display is positioned at 04:30, completing the inventory of functions.

Sporting an octagonal bezel, the profile of this model honours the watch brand’s iconic Laureato of 1975. Upholding Girard-Perregaux’s design philosophy, the case masterfully plays with different shapes. Moreover, the numerous curves, facets and lines, along with satin-finished and polished edges, collaborate, delivering a wonderful play with light.

A pane of sapphire crystal, positioned to the rear of the watch, affords sight of the automatic, Manufacture movement, the Calibre GP03300-0141, marking the first time a Laureato Chronograph features an open caseback. This movement, based on the highly regarded Calibre GP03300, is endowed with Côtes de Genève, in both circular and straight forms, polished sinks, thermally blued screws and perlage. The movement also bears the eagle emblem, signifying it is an in-house calibre.

The watch is housed in a 42mm 904L stainless steel case. This particular grade of steel is less common than 316L and is costlier, the relative benefits of which include superior corrosion resistance, improved scratch resistance and a much brighter, luxurious appearance. The use of 904L stainless steel extends to the bracelet which is enriched with a satin brushed finish.

When appraising the composition of the   Girard Perregaux Laureato Chronograph Aston Martin Edition , its profile encompasses different shapes, finishes and hues. Its design delivers functionality and beauty. Furthermore, it celebrates the past while simultaneously embracing the future. It is this approach that resonates with both companies, reinforcing the rationale for the ongoing alliance between the two prestigious marques.

The Girard Perregaux Laureato Chronograph Aston Martin Edition, a limited edition of 188 pieces, is immediately available worldwide in all authorised Girard-Perregaux retailers.

Girard-Perregaux Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges

In 1867, Girard-Perregaux unveiled the ‘Tourbillon with Three Gold Bridges’ and an icon was born. Unusually, the bridges, three functional parts typically hidden from view, were made an aesthetic element. By taking this decision, the Manufacture became known for making the invisible visible. This approach has been employed on several subsequent Girard-Perregaux models. With the advent of the new Girard-Perregaux Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges with Three Flying Bridges, the Maison perpetuates this design philosophy but with a few fascinating twists along the way.

This year marks the 230th anniversary of Girard-Perregaux Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges . As part of its celebrations, the Manufacture is revisiting its iconic models and releasing a number of new creations, often infused with a dose of modernity. The Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges is endowed with three Neo Bridges formed of pink gold, the first time all three Neo bridges have been made from this noble metal. Interestingly, after releasing the Free bridge in 2020, the release of the new Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges will be the final subfamily to join the company’s Bridges collection.
The Girard-Perregaux Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges not only support the geartrain, barrel and tourbillon, they also act as the mainplate. The result is that the bridges appear to float in mid-air, seemingly untouched by gravity. This unusual construction required the Maison to affix the indexes to the flange which in turn is attached to the case.

The upper and lower surfaces of the pink gold bridges are dressed in black PVD coating. They are the very antithesis of conspicuous consumption. Only the slim, vertical flanks of each bridge are exposed, providing a clue to their noble composition. Indeed, the bridges can be described as ‘super discreet luxury’ where only those in the know are aware of their precious nature. Each bridge is painstakingly chamfered by hand using a small piece of boxwood, a technique employed for hundreds of years. It takes a time-served artisan one full day to achieve a perfect finish. While the Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges appears contemporary, it still upholds many of the traditional techniques synonymous with Haute Horlogerie.
Patrick Pruniaux, CEO of Girard-Perregaux, remarks, “We wanted to create a watch that provides a bridge to our past but also demonstrates our vision for the future. It draws on the talents of our artisans and watchmakers, pairing traditional methods with innovative techniques. The Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges embraces three-dimensional architecture, allowing the wearer to see many parts typically hidden away. Since its inception, Girard-Perregaux has made the invisible visible, something I expect it will continue to do for the next 230 years. However, where our team has chosen to add a slight twist is by making the bridges from gold and then shrouding them in black PVD, save for their sides. It seems wonderfully indulgent, a trait synonymous with luxury, that will remain a secret to most people, except for those in the know.”

A notable characteristic of this timepiece is that it plays with three dimensional forms, positioning various dial elements at different heights, a characteristic shared in common with some of the world’s finest architectural structures. Despite its complexity, the dial remains clean, uncluttered and simple to read, with the barrel, gear train and tourbillon arranged along a north-south axis. The barrel is positioned in the upper portion of the dial and sits above a white gold micro-rotor, harnessing energy from the motion of the wearer’s wrist. The vertical sides of the rotor are engraved with the watch’s model name, a subtle detail which perfectly demonstrates the Manufacture’s obsession with the minutiae.
The tourbillon is positioned to the base of the dial. Its cage is lyre-shaped, a historical design dating back to the 19th century, albeit in this instance it is made of ultra-modern Grade 5 titanium. A blued hand on the cage rotates 360° every minute and serves as a small seconds display. The tourbillon cage is comprised of 79 components and weighs a mere 0.25 grams. This remarkably low mass mitigates energy consumption, thereby contributing to the movement’s impressive power-reserve of 60 hours (minimum).

The sapphire crystal, positioned atop the dial, has gently sloping sides that curve downwards to the outer edge of the case middle, hence the model eschews a conventional bezel. To achieve this eye­ catching aesthetic, it takes between four to five times more material than a regular sapphire crystal. It also necessitates much expertise to polish the crystal box to a flawless conclusion. Surprisingly, having expended much effort making this upper sapphire crystal, the time-served craftsperson has to repeat the exercise and make a similar crystal box to shroud the underside of the watch head. By equipping the Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges with upper and lower crystal box sapphire crystals, the Manufacture has imbued the model with a harmonious degree of symmetry.

The Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges is immediately available worldwide in all authorised Girard­ Perregaux retailers.
To commemorate its 230th anniversary Girard-Perregaux is announcing a new take on its well-regarded “Three Bridges” movement architecture. This week, during Geneva Watch Days, the brand released the new 18k rose gold 44mm Tourbillon With Three Flying Bridges – a futuristic take on a Victorian-era invention.
The three bridges have been a mainstay for the brand since the mid to late 19th century. GP was effectively the first brand to pluck the bridges from obscurity (they are generally a hidden component of the overall movement) and make them a spotlight design feature. Late 1800’s iterations of the three-bridges had them made from platinum. The brand has used all manner of precious metals in the past, but for the first time, all three bridges on the front are fashioned from pink gold – with the upper and lower surfaces coated in black PVD (the three bridges on the back are PVD coated titanium).
Aside from the the literal function the bridges provide in supporting the gear train, barrel, and tourbillon, they also act as the mainplate which is where the touches of futurism come into play. Each of the bridges achieve a level of optical illusion as they appear to be floating freely. Adding to the space-age aesthetic are the markers, which are attached to the flange (outer dial) which, in turn, is affixed to the case.

The tourbillon is positioned toward the bottom of the dial in a lyre-shaped cage featuring a blued hand that moves in a 360 degree rotation, thereby acting as a small seconds indicator.

Girard Perregaux Laureato Absolute Ti 230

Girard Perregaux Laureato Absolute Ti 230 has added a number of new features to its latest Laureato model, bumping up the classic’s sports watch credentials.

The Girard Perregaux Laureato Absolute Ti 230 is offered in blue and grey versions and features a lightweight 44mm sandblasted grade-5 titanium case, with polished facets highlighting the metal’s matte finish.

Not only does the Absolute feature a sandwich dial, with hour marker cut outs revealing a layer of luminous material beneath, but also debuts a crown set with a rubber ring for better grip.

The watch is also only the second to feature Girard-Perregaux’s Rubber Alloy strap technology, which debuted in white gold on the brand’s recent Aston Martin collaboration, which involves metal-injected rubber and is presented here with a fabric-effect embossed pattern.

Inside is a Calibre GP03300-1060 automatic movement, which features a 46-hour power reserve, date indication and a central seconds hand.

Patrick Pruniaux, CEO of Girard-Perregaux, remarks, “With the release of the Laureato Absolute Ti 230 we wanted to create a new version of our iconic watch from 1975. This model is modern but encompasses traditional craftsmanship. The sandwich dial construction and GP’s world-premiere Rubber Alloy strap, this time incorporating titanium, are further sumptuous details that also feature on this watch. Finally, while the price may be more inclusive, the quality remains typically Girard-Perregaux and the watch feels just as exclusive as our other models.”

The grey version is available via Girard Perregaux Laureato Absolute Ti 230 and its retailers now while the blue version is available exclusively through retailer Wempe’s boutiques in Germany, London and New York for the next month.

Girard Perregaux Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges Aston Martin Edition

The first timepiece borne of the recently announced partnership between Girard-Perregaux and Aston Martin has been revealed. The Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges – Aston Martin Edition unites the watchmaking expertise of Girard-Perregaux with Aston Martin’s unique knowledge of luxury and performance. The Girard Perregaux Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges Aston Martin Edition will be delivered
Both brands demonstrate a passion for refined craftsmanship and have been working together, sharing their understanding of design, materials and technology. This latest model celebrates the iconic Three Bridges pocket watch from the 19th century in a decidedly contemporary way, down to the smallest details, including the strap. A sapphire crystal ‘box’ is positioned front of house, as well as to the rear, coaxing light to illuminate the case interior, thereby augmenting readability. The 44 millimetre case of the Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges – Aston Martin Edition is formed of Grade 5 titanium, a strong, hypoallergenic alloy selected by Aston Martin for its lightweight properties. It is suffused with black DLC, bestowing the watch with a stealthy appearance. Interestingly, titanium ore was discovered in Great Britain, the home of Aston Martin, back in 1791 by an English clergyman, William Gregor, in the same year Girard-Perregaux was founded. Upholding Girard-Perregaux tradition, this model skilfully plays with proportions and shapes much to the delight of aesthetes.
Three bridges, an iconic signature of Girard-Perregaux, span the dial and are formed of titanium with black PVD treatment and polished angles. The design endows the timepiece with an airy appearance, affording breathtaking views of movement components ordinarily hidden from view. While Girard-Perregaux has a long history of making the invisible visible, in this instance it has ventured off-piste, creating a watch whose movement appears to levitate within the case. This is achieved by paring back the movement, causing the mainplate to seemingly disappear within the case, thereby creating the illusion of the movement flying within the case. The car company’s name is engraved on the vertical flank of the micro-rotor and is filled with white luminescent treatment which appears blue in restricted light.
The first timepiece borne of the recently announced partnership between Girard-Perregaux and Aston Martin has been revealed. The Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges – Aston Martin Edition unites the watchmaking expertise of Girard-Perregaux with Aston Martin’s unique knowledge of luxury and performance.
Earlier this year, Girard-Perregaux announced a new partnership with Aston Martin, most famous for being the carmaker of choice for James Bond. The watchmaker also signed on as a sponsor of the Aston Martin Cognizant Formula One racing team, but a collaborative watch was absent, until now.

Girard-Perregaux has just taken the covers off the inaugural watch of the partnership, the Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges – Aston Martin Edition, a sleek, modern interpretation of the watchmaker’s signature complication.
When the partnership was first revealed, the first watch that came to mind was an auto-racing chronograph on an integrated bracelet, making the all-black tourbillon a bit of a surprise. But the integrated-bracelet sports watch is now commonplace, so I am glad Girard-Perregaux went with the Flying Bridges tourbillon, a complication unique to the brand.

The tourbillon movement is, of course, an evolution of the brand’s iconic Tourbillon with Three Gold Bridges that was invented in the mid-19th century and found in Girard-Perregaux’s finest pocket watches, including one that was sold to the then President of Mexico, the famous “La Esmeralda”.
First, the case as well as the movement bridges are titanium coated with diamond-like carbon (DLC). And the style of the movement has been revamped, with streamlined, flowing bridges and maximum skeletonisation to create floating, organic forms.

While the watch and movement are impressively executed, something a bit more novel would have made a bigger impact as the partnership’s first model. Perhaps it’s just because the British carmaker has other issues to deal with as its tie up with Girard Perregaux comes as it embarks on a fresh start, having been rescued by fashion tycoon Lawrence Stroll last year. Partnerships between automakers and high horology watchmakers do typically result in all-new models and movements, so the two brands likely have something else in the pipeline.
A large but lightweight watch, the Tourbillon with Three Flying Bridges is 44 mm wide and 15.52 mm high. But its effective height is significantly less, because much of its thickness is due to the highly domed sapphire crystals on the front and back.

A crucial part of the movement’s visual presentation, the “box type” sapphire crystal rises upwards from the case, allowing for a panoramic view of the calibre, even from the side.

At the same time, the height of the crystal allows for vertical hour markers that stand parallel to the plane of the dial. Each hour marker contains a block of Super-Luminova resin for excellent nighttime legibility, but because the markers are vertical, they do not obscure any part of the movement.
While seemingly simple in form – being maximally skeletonised – the Flying Bridges tourbillon is actually automatic. The uppermost bridge holds the barrel, which smartly hides a compact micro-rotor of 18k white gold.

Though camouflaged by the barrel, the micro-rotor is clearly visible at an angle – and in the dark. Its outer edge is engraved “Aston Martin”, which is then filled with luminescent material that’ll glow in the dark. The second bridge in the middle supports the hands as well as the gear train, while the third bridge at six o’clock carries the tourbillon. Notably, the base plate that supports the bridges in the Neo Tourbillon has been removed, enhancing the levitating effect and leaving the bridges only anchored on each end.
Last but not least, the watch is delivered with an extra strap of calfskin strap with a silver stripe down its centre. Named Rubber Alloy, the stripe is an insert of “injected white gold on rubber”, essentially rubber coated in white gold, an industry first that injects a bit of flair into the monochromatic look.

Girard Perregaux Laureato Absolute Wired

Girard-Perregaux is celebrating its 230th anniversary this year by finally launching its own e-commerce platform for watch sales.

To give customers a reason to shop direct through the brand, it has created an exclusive limited edition Laureato chronograph reference with a high tech composite case material that can only be purchased through its own channel.

The 44mm case and its bezel are both made from Girard-Perregaux’s Carbon Glass, a material formed form layers of carbon fiber and fiberglass before being baked under pressure in an autoclave. The resulting case material presents irregular, alternating layers of both opaque and translucent materials, with a tactile matte surface, forming patterns which ensures that each of the 88 pieces being produced are unique.

Here black Carbon Glass is used for the case and a striking blue shade used for the Laureato’s iconic bezel. While black-PVD treated titanium is used for the buckle, chronograph pushers and crown, even the case is milled from Carbon Glass.

Girard-Perregaux first introduced the Laureato Absolute line in 2019 as a space within the collection to experiment with contemporary takes on the classic model, which first appeared at the height of the first wave of the stainless steel sports watch in 1975.

The Girard-Perregaux Laureato Absolute Wired, which uses a 4Hz automatic chronograph movement formed of 419 components and with a power reserve of 46 hours, will first be available to customers in the US and UK, priced at $250 here.

Also in watches check out De Bethune’s $250 USD reversible, double-dialed tourbillion.

Girard Perregaux Vintage 1945 watch

The Girard Perregaux Vintage 1945 is a piece of art that is a showcase of Art Deco but also catering to modern tastes. It’s easily a standout with its square shape and curvature, but it also lets you into the magic behind the piece, allowing you to appreciate the work that goes
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Shop a wide selection of Replica Girard-Perregaux Vintage 1945 watches, in yellow gold, rose gold, stainless steel, and more on World’s Best. Global shipping available. Girard-Perregaux Vintage 1945 Tourbillon With Three Gold Bridges 70th Anniversary Edition 99880B-53-H000-BA6A White Gold Watch
The Girard Perregaux Vintage 1945 is a piece of art that is a showcase of Art Deco but also catering to modern tastes. It’s easily a standout with its square shape and curvature, but it also lets you into the magic behind the piece, allowing you to appreciate the work that goes into a Girard Perregaux piece.
The Vintage 1945 Infinity Edition and the 1966 Infinity Editions capture the elegance of a black tie soirée. Indeed, they demonstrate Girard-Perregaux’s capacity to imbue watches with notable design flair, seemly aesthetics and the brand’s legendary savoir-faire.
Girard-Perregaux Vintage 1945 Earth to Sky Edition The watch, officially dubbed the Vintage 1945 Earth to Sky Edition and essentially a reworking of a 2014 model, the more conventionally named Vintage 1945 Large Date Moon Phases, is an interesting amalgamation of an early 20th-century rectangular case and dial design with definitely modern materials and aesthetics.